Department of Art


Department of Art + Design,
Art History, Art Education

Events

Find out about upcoming events in the Department of Art + Design, Art History, Art Education. You can keep up with the latest news.

Department of Art + Design and AIGA Baltimore present
Film Viewing and discussion. Art 21 "Identity" Season 1 Episode 3.

This event is part of Art21's Access 100 Artists, a celebration of contemporary art and Art in the Twenty-First Century, Season One through Six, sponsored by Art21. Visit art21.org for more information.
Thursday, September 26, 6:30 p.m.
Center for the Arts, Art Lecture Hall, CA 2032
Free

February

ENCOUNTERING NATURE
Center for the Arts Gallery
Opening Reception: Thurs., Feb. 7, 7:30–9 p.m.
Friday, February 8 – Saturday, April 6
Gallery Hours:  Tuesday – Saturday, 11 a.m.–4 p.m.
Closed for Spring Break: Mon., March 18 – Sat., March 24
The Department of Art + Design is pleased to present an exhibition that examines some of the ways artists respond to nature in their work. Many artists today look at nature through the eyes of climate change, toxic pollution, or overdevelopment. Still others engage art historically, operating out of a landscape painting tradition. This exhibition brings together installation, video, photography, painting, and sculpture to examine the myriad ways that artists interact with nature. Artists whose works will be on display in this exhibition include: Ann Appleby, Vaughn Bell, Susan Benarcik, Randy Bolton, Ann Chahbandour, Caitlin Cunningham, Annette Davidek, Adam Davies, Elizabeth Demarey, Madeleine Dietz, Laurie Hogin, Dan Jackson, Guy Loraine, Rachel Rotenberg, Bill Scott, Kate Stewart, Ted Walsh and Ben Whitehouse. In conjunction with the exhibition, there will be a symposium on April 5th and 6th that brings together scientists from Towson University’s Graduate Environmental Studies Program and the Department of Biology with artists of the exhibition, along with TU art history faculty members who publish on related topics.

BEN WHITEHOUSE LECTURE: TOWARDS A NEW LANDSCAPE
Center for the Arts, Lecture Hall, Room 2032
Thursday, February 7, 6:30 p.m.

The Department of Art + Design is pleased to present a lecture by artist Ben Whitehouse. Whitehouse is a British painter and video artist based in Chicago. He comments: "we inhabit a rapidly changing environment. How we image that environment says a great deal about how we relate to it. How do you, as an individual, deal with a changing environment?" Whitehouse paints landscapes in a highly representational style that is attendant to the time of day and the quality of light. He also creates time-based videos of such sites as Stonehenge in England and Central Park in NYC, producing twenty-four hours of unbroken video in high definition. Every second is recorded; every shift of light, every moment that occurs within the composition is captured. He has shown his work at the McNay Art Museum, San Antonio, TX; Crocker Art Museum, Sacramento, CA; Perimeter Gallery, Chicago, IL; Arkansas Art Center, Little Rock, AK; Tarble Art Center, Eastern Illinois University, The Delaware Center for the Contemporary Arts, Wilmington, DE; David Klein Gallery, Birmingham, MI; and the Grand Rapids Art Museum, MI.

ALEKSANDRA KATARGINA: FIGURE AS LANGUAGE
Master of Fine Arts Exhibition, Holtzman MFA Gallery, Center for the Arts
Opening Reception: Thurs., February 7, 7:30–9 p.m.
Friday, February 8 – Saturday, March 16 
Gallery Hours:  Tuesday – Saturday, 11 a.m.–4 p.m.
MFA candidate Aleksandra Katargina sees the human body as mirroring in posture and expression the inner world of its owner, as well as showing the influence of its surrounding environment. She comments, “A figure is a universal language; looking at the body the viewer can connect and associate with it. The feelings of a two-dimensional character come to life in movement and gesture. A human body is versatile, it may transform from a compositional element to an abstract idea to tactile experience.” Katargina creates oil paintings in which she explores the figure as a powerful form of expression that reflects the contemporary world.

JORDAN BERNIER: WAYS OF SEEING THE BIRTH OF TRAGEDY
Master of Fine Arts Exhibition, Holtzman MFA Gallery, Center for the Arts
Opening Reception: Thurs., February 7, 7:30–9 p.m.
Friday, February 8 – Saturday, March 16 
Gallery Hours:  Tuesday – Saturday, 11 a.m.–4 p.m.
MFA candidate Jordan Bernier utilizes digital media to address digital culture’s ability to appropriate, recontextualize, and alter original works, whether it is through concept, aesthetic, or process. Based on essays by critic and author John Berger and philosopher Frederick Neitzsche, this exhibition examines the changing perception of images in the 21st century.

KELLY BRADY: SYNCRETIC CULTURE
Master of Fine Arts Exhibition, Holtzman MFA Gallery, Center for the Arts
Opening Reception: Thurs., February 7, 7:30–9 p.m.
Friday, February 8 – Saturday, March 16 
Gallery Hours:  Tuesday – Saturday, 11 a.m.–4 p.m.

MFA candidate Kelly Brady employs collaged digital images with handwritten ink text, producing prints that show the movements, lapse of time and change in space that occur during the process of making a meal, while also revealing the personal, historical and cultural narrative of the cook. Through this work, Brady attempts to distill cultural information using theoretical and methodological anthropological practice—essentially, the visualization of ethnography. The exhibition will offer a starting point for discussion regarding the cultural narrative and social landscape in the space and place of a kitchen.

COLETTE FU: WE ARE TIGER DRAGON PEOPLE
Asian Arts Gallery, Center for the Arts
Artist Talk and Opening Reception: Thurs., February 7, 7–9 p.m.
Thursday, February 7 – Saturday, March 16

Dynamic and dangerous, Colette Fu’s pop-up books are anything but child-like. These shifting, stretching collages mark her professional maturation from an amateur photographer to a skilled artist. Through the combination of photography and pop-up paper engineering, Fu creates one-of-a-kind collapsible artist books that reflect ideas on how our selves relate to society today. Fu’s series of pop-up books, drawing on her tribal Chinese heritage and chronicling the 25 ethnic minorities of Yunnan Province, China, eliminate the boundaries between book, installation, photography, craft and sculpture. Guest Curator: Prof. Susan Isaacs.

March

THE TIGER TALES: SHADOW PUPPET THEATER
Center for the Arts, Mainstage Theatre
Saturday, March 2, 1 p.m. and 3 p.m. (two shows)

In celebration of the lunar New Year, the Chinese Theatre Works, based in New York, brings its humor-laced shadow puppetry to audiences of all ages. The company blends China's two thousand year history of shadow puppetry with new techniques in its award-winning Tiger Tales, based on popular Chinese folktales and literature. In conjunction with the paper art workshop. For more Information: 410-704-2807
Admission: $10 general; $5 AA&CC members and TU students with ID

JACOB RHODES LECTURE: TENNIS COURT HOOLIGAN'S: THE CANDY SKIN PROJECT / FIELD PROJECTS GALLERY: WHY START YOUR OWN GALLERY IN CHELSEA?
Center for the Arts, Lecture Hall, Room 2032
Thursday, March 7, 6:30 p.m.

The Department of Art + Design is pleased to present a lecture by artist Jacob Rhodes. In his work, he explores codes of masculinity, class and the inherent violence in homo-social interaction. The middle child of three boys born to a car mechanic and a school cafeteria cook, Jacob spent his youth touring in punk bands, publishing zines, and self-producing records. Rhodes received his BFA in New Genre and Photography from Otis College of Art and Design in Los Angeles. After graduating, he joined the US Army, spending three years in Alaska at Fort Wainwright’s 172nd Arctic Infantry Brigade. In 2005, he returned to school attending Skowhegan School of Painting and then earned his MFA in Sculpture at Yale School of Art in 2007. He has shown his work at the Bronx Museum, Alona Kagan Gallery, New York, Federal Art Project, Los Angeles, Galerie Im Regierungsviertel, Berlin, and Bart Wells Institute, London. He currently lives and works in Brooklyn, NY.

DR. JASON CIEJKA LECTURE: ARCHITECTURE AND THE BODY IN BAROQUE ITALY
Center for the Arts, Lecture Hall, Room 2032
Thursday, March 28, 6:30 p.m.
The Department of Art + Design is pleased to present a lecture by Dr. Jason Ciejka, Associate Director of Programs in the Office of Undergraduate Education at Emory University. He will speak about a longstanding metaphor that linked the human body to architecture, a relationship that was widely contested during the seventeenth century. He will examine how the tremendous stylistic innovation of the Baroque period exerted pressure on the symbolism and rhetoric of architecture. An analysis of specific buildings from Rome and Venice indicates that the dynamic and energetic qualities of the human body increasingly governed the imagination of architects. Dr. Ciejka's talk will consider the debate between these structures and their critics, who sometimes distorted the metaphor, ultimately suggesting that Baroque architecture had become a strange and even monstrous body.

April

DR. NANCY SIEGEL LECTURE: ENCOUNTERING NATURE: ENVIRONMENTAL AWARENESS IN AMERICAN ART
Part of the Encountering Nature Symposium

Center for the Arts, Lecture Hall, Room 2032
Thursday, April 4, 6:30 p.m.

The Department of Art + Design is pleased to present a lecture by Dr. Nancy Siegel as Part I of the Encountering Nature Symposium; she will discuss the manner in which environmental awareness has been addressed by American artists from the 18th to the 21st centuries. Siegel is Associate Professor of Art History at Towson University. She has lectured, curated, and published widely on topics related to the American landscape and women artists. She is currently working on a television series, Political Appetites: In Search of America’s Historic Foodways.

SYMPOSIUM: ENCOUNTERING NATURE
Center for the Arts, Lecture Hall, Room 2032
Friday, April 5, 10 a.m–12:30 p.m.

The Department of Art + Design is pleased to present the second part of the symposium on encounters with nature. Several artists whose works are included in the exhibition Encountering Nature in the Center for the Arts Gallery, along with Towson University scientists Steven M. Lev, Professor of Geosciences Department of Physics, Astronomy and Geosciences and Graduate Director of the Environmental Science Program and Joel W. Snodgrass, Professor of Conservation Biology and Chairperson of the Department of Biological Sciences, will present illustrated lectures and then answer questions presented by a moderator and the audience. Moderator: J. Susan Isaacs, Professor of Art History and Director of the M.A. in Professional Studies/Art History focus and curator of the Encountering Nature exhibition. Professor Isaacs will also offer a tour of the exhibition following the symposium.

KATJA TOPORSKI: MATERIAL CONTINUUM
Master of Fine Arts Exhibition, Holtzman MFA Gallery, Center for the Arts
Opening Reception: Thurs., April 4, 7:30–9 p.m.
Friday, April 5 – Saturday, May 11
MFA candidate Katja Toporski explores small-scale jewelry and its intimate relationship with the body. She sees jewelry as “a vehicle for objects that are dear to us, ones that carry personal or spiritual meaning or act as objects of remembrance.” Toporski is interested in the cyclical structure of the necklace to illustrate ideas about material change: permanence and the ephemeral, growth and decay, and the cycle of life and death. She works juxtaposes ephemeral materials—charcoal dust, diatomaceous earth, and cast gelatin—with more permanent ones—concrete, metals, and plastic.

ANDREW SNYDER: CATALYST
Master of Fine Arts Exhibition, Holtzman MFA Gallery, Center for the Arts
Opening Reception: Thurs., April 4, 7:30–9 p.m.
Friday, April 5 – Saturday, May 11

MFA candidate Andrew Snyder presents a large, minimal floor installation of thrown and digitally printed bowls. The exhibition is a commentary on the alleged waning of the field of ceramics in contemporary art and craft’s movement toward the realm of design. An installation of simple thrown bowls represents the tradition of clay, while digitally printed bowls starkly contrast with the medium’s roots. Driven by the disparate processes, the installation is as much about the act of making as the final product.

PASSAGE FROM INDIA: ARTS by SIONA BENJAMIN & MAUREEN DRDAK
Asian Arts Gallery, Center for the Arts
Saturday, April 6 – Saturday, May 11
Artists Talk and Reception: Sat., April 13, 2–4 p.m.

The exhibition features two global artists, Siona Benjamin and Maureen Drdak, both Fulbright Scholars in 2011. Siona Benjamin is a painter originally from Bombay, now living in the US. Her work reflects her background of being brought up Jewish in a predominantly Hindu and Muslim India—a mosaic inspired by both Indian Miniature paintings and Sephardic icons. Maureen Drdak’s work incorporates ancient repoussé techniques transmitted from Nepali Master, rich in eastern and western iconographies and cultural paradigms, breaching the boundaries between material realms and practices.

A.M. WEAVER LECTURE: DEMYSTIFICATION OF THE CURATORIAL PROCESS
Center for the Arts, Lecture Hall, Room 2032
Thursday, April 18, 6:30 p.m.
A.M. Weaver will provide an insight into the training and mind of the curator by walking through her process of organizing several thematic exhibitions. She will address the underlying themes of the exhibitions and present an illustrated lecture that exemplifies relationships she feels exist in the work of the chosen artists. She will also address how she keeps abreast of diverse trends in the contemporary arts and the development of her aesthetic philosophy. Weaver is a writer and art curator with more than thirty years of experience. She has published articles in the International African, American Art Review, Art in America, Art South Africa, Fiberarts, Surface Design Journal, Aperture, Frieze and African Arts and has written in-depth catalog essays for many institutions.

UNDERGRADUATE JURIED STUDENT EXHIBITION
Center for the Arts, Center for the Arts Gallery
Opening Reception: Thurs., April 18, 7:30–9 p.m.
Friday, April 19 – Saturday, May 11 
The annual undergraduate juried exhibition features students’ works that represent the various tracks, including painting/printmaking, sculpture, graphic design, illustration, interdisciplinary object design, metalworking/jewelry, digital art and design, and photography. This year’s juror is independent curator and critic A.M. Weaver.

May

40TH ANNUAL POTTERY SALE
Center for the Arts, Ceramics Suite, Room 3010
Preview: Friday, May 3, 6–9 p.m.
Sale: Saturday, May 4, 9 a.m.–6 p.m.

An bi-annual event, the ceramic guild at Towson present functional and fine art ceramic sculpture and hand thrown pottery for sale made by students and faculty. Come help support the department and find some unique artwork.

 

 

 

 

 

of note

• View complete list of events on the Arts & Culture Calendar

• View Gallery Information


Jaime Salm, Creative Director of Mio Culture


ART FACULTY EXHIBITION

Faculty examples of their recent aesthetic concerns in a broad range of media will be on display in the CFA Gallery through Sat., Dec. 8.

 

 

 

Map

Emergencies
410-704-4444

University Police
410-704-2134

Closings & News
410-704-NEWS (6397)

Text Alerts
Sign up now