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Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drug (ATOD) Abuse Prevention Center

Education

Core Survey Results

The Core Survey data collection has occurred every other spring semester since approximately 1997. The data collection is one of the responsibilities of the Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drug (ATOD) Prevention Center, which is supported through grant funds provided by the Maryland Alcohol and Drug Abuse Administration (ADAA), Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. The Towson University ATOD Center is one of four centers in the State, funded via ADAA grant funds. The data obtained through this initiative is reported to Towson University’s Substance Education and Concerns Committee which meets monthly to oversee alcohol and drug prevention activities, monitor substance use trends on campus and review substance abuse policies and enforcement practices.

The instrument used is the Core Survey, a nationally recognized survey described by its developers at the Core Institute, Southern Illinois University, as a “a valuable tool for determining how to target populations for prevention programming, designing social marketing and media advocacy campaigns, and assessing the impact of these prevention efforts” http://core.siu.edu/

The data collection project has been reviewed by the Towson University IRB and approval has been granted. A cluster sampling approach is used to collect the data, randomly selecting courses from each of the colleges. Faculty may choose not to participate just as students in the selected course, when given access, may choose not to complete the survey. Student anonymity is preserved; no identifiers are used that can link a student to survey responses. In our experience conducting the survey throughout the years, both students and faculty have largely been supportive of the effort and response rates are high.

Randomized Undergraduate Sample, Spring 2012 Core Survey Results (PDF)

Incoming Freshmen Only, Fall 2013 Core Survey Results (PDF)

Towson University Alcohol & Other Drug Programming, 2013 Biennial Report (PDF)

Consequences of Drinking

Death: 1,700 college students between the ages of 18 and 24 die each year from alcohol-related unintentional injuries, including motor vehicle crashes (Hingson et al., 2005)

Injury: 599,000 students between the ages of 18 and 24 are unintentionally injured under the influence of alcohol (Hingson et al., 2005)


Assault: More than 696,000 students between the ages of 18 and 24 are assaulted by another student who has been drinking (Hingson et al., 2005)

Sexual Abuse: More than 97,000 students between the ages of 18 and 24 are victims of alcohol-related sexual assault or date rape (Hingson et al., 2005)

Unsafe Sex: 400,000 students between the ages of 18 and 24 had unprotected sex and more than 100,000 students between the ages of 18 and 24 report having been too intoxicated to know if they consented to having sex (Hingson et al., 2002)

Academic Problems: About 25 percent of college students report academic consequences of their drinking including missing class, falling behind, doing poorly on exams or papers, and receiving lower grades overall (Engs et al., 1996; Presley et al., 1996a, 1996b; Wechsler et al., 2002)

Health Problems/Suicide Attempts: More than 150,000 students develop an alcohol-related health problem (Hingson et al., 2002) and between 1.2 and 1.5 percent of students indicate that they tried to commit suicide within the past year due to drinking or drug use (Presley et al., 1998).

Drunk Driving: 2.1 million students between the ages of 18 and 24 drove under the influence of alcohol last year (Hingson et al., 2002).

Vandalism: About 11 percent of college student drinkers report that they have damaged property while under the influence of alcohol (Wechsler et al., 2002).

Property Damage: More than 25 percent of administrators from schools with relatively low drinking levels and over 50 percent from schools with high drinking levels say their campuses have a "moderate" or "major" problem with alcohol-related property damage (Wechsler et al., 1995).

Police Involvement: About 5 percent of 4-year college students are involved with the police or campus security as a result of their drinking (Wechsler et al., 2002) and an estimated 110,000 students between the ages of 18 and 24 are arrested for an alcohol-related violation such as public drunkenness or driving under the influence (Hingson et al., 2002).

Alcohol Abuse and Dependence: 31 percent of college students met criteria for a diagnosis of alcohol abuse and 6 percent for a diagnosis of alcohol dependence in the past 12 months, according to questionnaire-based self-reports about their drinking (Knight et al., 2002).

References

Engs RC, Diebold BA, Hansen DJ. The drinking patterns and problems of a national sample of college students, 1994. Journal of Alcohol and Drug Education 41(3):13-33, 1996

Hingson RW, Heeren T, Zakocs RC, Kopstein A, Wechsler H. Magnitude of alcohol-related mortality and morbidity among U.S. college students ages 18-24. Journal of Studies on Alcohol 63(2):136-144, 2002

Hingson, R. et al. Magnitude of Alcohol-Related Mortality and Morbidity Among U.S. College Students Ages 18-24: Changes from 1998 to 2001. Annual Review of Public Health, vol. 26, 259-79; 2005

Knight JR, Wechsler H, Kuo M, Seibring M, Weitzman ER, Schuckit M. Alcohol abuse and dependence among U.S. college students. Journal of Studies on Alcohol, 2002, in press.

Presley CA, Meilman PW, Cashin JR. Alcohol and Drugs on American College Campuses: Use, Consequences, and Perceptions of the Campus Environment, Vol. IV: 1992-1994. Carbondale, IL: Core Institute, Southern Illinois University, 1996a.

Presley CA, Meilman PW, Cashin JR, Lyerla R. Alcohol and Drugs on American College Campuses: Use, Consequences, and Perceptions of the Campus Environment, Vol. III: 1991-1993. Carbondale, IL: Core Institute, Southern Illinois University, 1996b

Presley CA, Leichliter MA, Meilman PW. Alcohol and Drugs on American College Campuses: A Report to College Presidents: Third in a Series, 1995, 1996, 1997. Carbondale, IL: Core Institute, Southern Illinois University, 1998.

Wechsler H, Moeykens B, Davenport A, Castillo S, Hansen J. The adverse impact of heavy episodic drinkers on other college students. Journal of Studies on Alcohol 56(6):628-634, 1995.

Wechsler H, Lee JE, Kuo M, Seibring M, Nelson TF, Lee HP. Trends in college binge drinking during a period of increased prevention efforts: Findings from four Harvard School of Public Health study surveys, 1993-2001. Journal of American College Health 50(5):203-217, 2002.

 

Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drug Prevention Center
Linthicum Hall, Room 215
Donna M. Cox, Ph.D., Director
Phone: 410-704-3723
E-mail: dcox@towson.edu

Allison Frey, Co-Director
Phone: 410-704-2512
E-mail: afrey@towson.edu


 

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