FALL 2010 COURSE OFFERINGS
IN JUDAIC STUDIES, JEWISH COMMUNAL SERVICE
AND JEWISH EDUCATION AT TOWSON UNIVERSITY


BIBLICAL AND ANCIENT NEAR EASTERN CIVILIZATIONS

JDST 600: BIBLICAL LITERATURE AND CIVILIZATION


Dr. Barry M. Gittlen

Monday, 7:00-9:40 pm


The major literary product of Israelite civilization, the Bible is the primary vehicle for the understanding of  this civilization. Critical examination of the Bible, its literature, and its cultural setting produces a more  informed knowledge of literary form, style and function in ancient Israel; an intelligent understanding of Israel’s literature, history and civilization during the first millennium B.C.E.; and insight into Israel’s religious ideas, institutions and theology which are reflected in this great literature.

JDST 609: II KINGS -SOCIO-LITERARY PERSPECTIVES


Dr. Barry M. Gittlen

Wednesday, 4:00-6:40pm


II Kings surveys the history of Israel and Judah from the death of King Ahab (850 B.C.E.) to the Babylonian conquest and exile of Judah in 586 B.C.E. Exploring beyond the historical setting of II Kings, our analysis will seek to understand the text’s literary portrayal of ideological, theological, historiography, and overarching cultural issues, the nature of literary genres, and the composition of the target audience to which the narrative originally spoke.

RLST 103.001: EXPLORING BIBLICAL ARCHAEOLOGY (UNDERGRADUATE –GEN ED IID)


Dr. Barry M. Gittlen

Tuesday and Thursday, 2:00-3:15 pm


This course gives students insight into the nature of archaeological evidence and the difficulties involved in interpreting and applying this evidence to cultural problems in ancient Israel and its neighboring states. After introducing the theory, method and principles of archaeology as practiced in Israel, we examine fundamental issues in the archaeology of Israel. Special attention will be paid to correlations between text and artifact as well as to the role of archaeology in the study of ancient Israel and her neighbors in the biblical period.

RLST 201.001: INTRODUCTION TO THE HEBREW BIBLE (UNDERGRADUATE
GEN ED II.C.1)


Dr. Susanna Garfein

Tuesday and Thursday, 11:00-12:15 pm


The Hebrew Bible or Old Testament is arguably the most read text in the history of civilization. It may also be the most misread. This course introduces you to the Old Testament (or Tanakh as Jews refer to it) and the culture that produced it. This course delivers a broad overview of the history and literature of the Bible, surveying various biblical books and offering not only a background to the biblical period but also to the structure of biblical literature and its interpretation.


JEWISH HISTORY


JDST 650.001: JEWS UNDER ISLAM


Guest Professor: Jonathan Ray, Samuel Eig Assist. Professor of Jewish Studies, Georgetown University

Mondays, 4:00 pm --6:30 pm


This course will explore the major intellectual and cultural trends of the Jews living in the Islamic world from the rise of Islam through the 19th century. Topics to be covered include the relationship between Judaism and Islam, the legal status of the Jews, the organization and structure of the Jewish community and major developments in Jewish religion, philosophy, literature, and folklore.

JEWISH THOUGHT AND MYSTICISM


JDST 661: TANYA –
THE MAGNUM OPUS OF HASIDIC LITERATURE


Dr. Shimon Shokek

Tuesday, 7:00-9:40 pm


This course introduces central themes in the influential masterpiece of Hasidism known as Tanya. Our study will unfold focal religious beliefs that have become inseparable from the spiritual world of Hasidism during the last three centuries under the influence of the Tanya. Among them are the religious stature of the righteous; the influence of evil on the soul; the praxis of human attachment to divine reality; Hasidic gates of repentance and forgiveness; communion with the divine through spiritual happiness; letters and words as divine ontology; the religious process of speech, thought, and action; and spiritual living in a state of nothingness.

RLST 206: JUDAISM, CHRISTIANITY, AND ISLAM (UNDERGRADUATE –
GENED II.C.3)


Dr. Shimon Shokek

Monday and Wednesday, 3:30-4:45 pm


This course introduces major themes in the history, scriptures, doctrines, and practices of the three monotheistic religions: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. The course will explore the theological and philosophical meanings of monotheism, religious authority, worship and ritual, ethics, philosophy, and mysticism in the framework of these three monotheistic religions. Special emphasis will be put on similarities
and differences that have shaped the identity of each of these three religions.

RLST 370.004: JEWISH MYSTICISM AND KABBALAH (UNDERGRADUATE)

Dr. Shimon Shokek


Monday and Wednesday, 2:00-3:15 pm


This course introduces selected themes in Jewish mysticism and Kabbalah that have shaped the spiritual life of the Jewish people. The course will explore the emergence of early Jewish mysticism, the Kabbalah of Provence and Gerona, the classical Zohar, and the Kabbalah of Safed. Among the subjects to be discussed are Einsof the Infinite God, Sefirot and Divine Emanation, the Secret of the Creation of the World, Mystical Experience and Communion with God, and the Esoteric Language of the Bible.


RABBINIC HISTORY AND LITERATURE


JDST 781: FOR THE SAKE OF THE BOUND WOMAN THE RABBIS WERE LENIENT

Dr. Barry Freundel

Thursday, 7:00-9:40 pm


In wars and times of persecution or simply because of tragic happenstance, a Jewish man might disappear leaving his wife bound by law to a possibly dead husband. This course will explore how Jewish law dealt with this problem across the ages. Beginning with one of our earliest rabbinic texts, the Mishnah, tracing the treatment of this issue through the Gemara into the responsa and codes, and culminating in 20th and even 21st century rabbinic writings we will discover the broad range of rabbinic creativity and leniency brought to bear on this tragic issue. Along the way we will discover how in response to many tragic events in Jewish
history such as the Hadrianic Persecutions, the Crusades and the Holocaust, when this problem was prevalent, Jewish law adapted to give the many women caught in this situation the freedom to begin their lives again with a new husband and family. We will travel through these eras in chronological order culminating in a discussion of the 16 cases brought to the Rabbinical Council of America of men who disappeared at ground zero on 9/11.

RLST 210.001: INTRODUCTION TO JUDAISM (UNDERGRADUATE)


Dr. Barry Freundel

Tuesday and Thursday, 2:00-3:15 pm


This course offers a general introduction to Judaism. We will begin by discussing the basic identity structures of the Jew -culture, ethnicity, nationality, religion, values-and the part they play in forging people’s Jewish connection. The second segment of the course will deal with the intellectual life of the Jew. Starting with a
survey of critical canonical texts we will also look at historically significant non-canonical and anti-canonical works such as the Dead Sea Scrolls, the Apocrypha and the Christian Bible. We will also spend some time on the history and high points of secular Jewish literature. This will lead us into an exploration of Jewish law (Halakhah), ethics, prophecy, philosophy, mysticism and eschatology. The last part of our study will focus on ritual and symbolism. We will see how Jews have defined sacred space (land, temple, synagogue, household),
sacred time (the rituals of the day, the week, the year and the lifecycle), sacred objects (tallit, tefillin, mezuzah, kipah), sacred ritual (kashrut, mikvah), and sacred speech (liturgy). Throughout the semester, we will focus on the dynamics of Judaism as a religious "tradition," in which innovation and change emerges through asserting continuity with the past.

HONORS 370.005: HONORS SEMINAR ADVANCED TOPIC: JUDEO CHRISTIAN PERSPECTIVES IN MEDICAL
ETHICS (UNDERGRADUATE)


Dr. Barry Freundel

Tuesday and Thursday, 12:30-1:45 pm

Christianity and Judaism teach concerning cutting edge and long standing issues in the field of medical ethics. After a general introduction to the underlying ethical principles and structures of each way of thought and to each system’s approach to the medical practitioner and to health and healing in general, we will turn to specific topics such as abortion, cloning, pre-gender selection and euthanasia among others that will demonstrate how these basic ideas are then reflected in real world concerns of both historic and contemporary interest.
 

HEBR 103/JDST 544: BIBLICAL HEBREW I (HEBREW REQUIREMENT –GENED IID)

Dr. Susanna Garfein

Tuesday and Thursday, 2:00-3:15 pm (3 credits)


This course is an introduction to Hebrew with emphasis on the grammar, vocabulary, syntax and style of Classical Hebrew. This course teaches the fundamentals of Hebrew language as well as prepares students to read and translate classical Hebrew texts. This course serves as the foundation for the students’ continued studies of the classical Hebrew of the Hebrew Bible and rabbinic texts as well as the Hebrew of the contemporary idiom.

HEBR 203/ JDST 546: BIBLICAL HEBREW III (3 CREDITS) (HEBREW REQUIREMENT –GENED IID)


Dr. Susanna Garfein

Tuesday and Thursday, 3:30-4:45 pm


This course is for students who have completed 6 credits of Classical Hebrew. Students will continue their study of classical Hebrew texts with concentration on more complicated structures of Hebrew grammar, morphology, syntax, and vocabulary. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor.

HEBR 101: MODERN HEBREW I (3 CREDITS) (HEBREW REQUIREMENT –GEN ED IID)


Dr. Eyal Bor

Tuesday and Thursday, 12:30 -1:45 pm


This course is an introduction to the fundamental structure of Modern Hebrew grammar. The foundation for future comprehension will be established through basic language skills such as reading, writing, conversation and reading comprehension. Students will learn basic communication skills as well as the necessary vocabulary for reading of Modern Hebrew texts.

HEBR 202: MODERN HEBREW III (3 CREDITS) (HEBREW REQUIREMENT—GEN ED IID)

Dr. Eyal Bor

Tuesday and Thursday, 2:00-3:15 pm


This course is designed for students who have completed 6 credits of Modern Hebrew. Studentswill learn to recognize and use new and more complicated structures of Hebrew grammar and morphology as well as acquire vocabulary for more advanced reading of Modern Hebrew texts and conversation. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor

JEWISH COMMUNAL SERVICE


JCS 610: PRINCIPLES OF JEWISH COMMUNAL SERVICE

Dr. Valerie Thaler

Wednesday, 7:00-9:40 pm


A comprehensive overview of the American Jewish community today, and a survey of specific challenges facing professionals in the field of Jewish Communal Service. Topics include major themes of American Jewish history; an introduction to the organization of the American Jewish community in the 21st century, including current-day communal structures and institutional functions; an in-depth look at the most pressing issues confronting the American Jewish community today, as well as some of the newest solutions that have
been raised by lay and professional leaders; practical training in leadership skills.

JCS 618: SUPERVISED JEWISH COMMUNAL SERVICE INTERNSHIP (3 CREDITS)

Dr. Hana Bor


Students enrolled in the MAJCS program are required to complete a supervised field internship. This internship is carefully designed to develop leadership skills necessary to become a Jewish Communal professional. The internship will enable students to develop the skills necessary for professional growth and adhere to the individual goals. Students must complete a minimum of two full days per week in Jewish institution or organization [ex: The Associated, or other Jewish Federations, JCC etc.]


JCS 614: JEWISH COMMUNAL SERVICE PRACTICUM SEMINAR (1 CREDITS)

Dr. Hana Bor


Friday mornings from 10:00 am -12:00 pm (once a month)


The monthly practicum seminar provides an opportunity for Master of Arts in Jewish Communal Service [MAJCS] students to study with their peers and professional leaders.
Theoretical and practical aspects of contemporary issues are discussed as well as relations with lay leaders; and community visionaries. This seminar integrates the studies and professional development to enable students to be confident as they embark on their careers. Participation in the seminar is mandatory for a minimum of two years.


JEWISH EDUCATION


EDUC 670: MORAL QUESTIONS IN THE CLASSROOM (3 CREDITS)

Dr. Rebecca Shargel,

Mondays, 4:20– 6:50 pm


This course investigates the rationale for character education in schools. Students will study competing paradigms of moral education that include both conservative and liberal perspectives. In addition, students compare moral deliberations in Jewish, Catholic, and public settings.

ILPD 670 SPECIAL TOPICS: EDUCATIONAL EXPLORATION OF THE HOLOCAUST (3 CREDITS)


Dr. Hana Bor

Thursday, 7:00-9:30 pm


Students in this course will learn about the history of the Holocaust. The course will include analysis of the issues as well as exploration of effective teaching methodologies to communicate the subjects to their students. Modalities that enhance students understanding will include documents, films and interviews with survivors. Each student will prepare and present curricular units applicable to the teaching of Holocaust. There are no prerequisite required for this course.

ILPD 670 SPECIAL TOPICS: MENTORING IN A PROFESSIONAL LEARNING COMMUNITY (3 CREDITS)

Dr. Hana Bor and Dr. Richard Solomon

Summer: June 24, 25, 28, 29 and 30


Based on research, theory and best practices in mentoring and collaborative supervision, this practical course is designed to help veteran teachers, staff developers, current and future administrators, challenge and develop the capabilities of pre-service and in-service teachers within a professional learning community. Participants will experience and discuss these topics: The knowledge base and skills needed for mentoring and supervising preserves and in-service teachers. The knowledge base for teaching and learning, learning to teach, and reflection. The clinical supervision models. Observation forms and techniques for observation. Giving and receiving professional feedback.

EDUC 600: FOUNDATIONS OF JEWISH EDUCATION (3 CREDITS)


Dr. Rebecca Shargel,

Wednesdays, 7:00–9:40 pm


An introduction to the philosophy and history of Jewish education in the United States. The origins of the day school, congregational school, camping movements are explored.

EDUC 605: RESEARCH & TECHNOLOGY IN EDUCATION (GENERAL TOWSON EDUCATION COURSE)


Dr. Rebecca Shargel

Wednesday 4:20-6:50 pm


EDUC 794: PRACTICUM SEMINAR ON FRIDAY MORNINGS FROM 10:00-12:00 (ONCE A MONTH)


Dr. Hana Bor



INDEPENDENT STUDIES, INTERNSHIPS, THESIS AND DISSERTATION WRITING


JDST 617: JEWISH STUDIES INTERNSHIP (3 CREDITS)


Practical experiences within the historical profession. Prerequisite: Approval of the program director.

JDST 683: DIRECTED INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH (2-4 CREDITS)


Research and reading with a topic to be selected by the instructor and student. Prerequisite: Graduate standing, 18 units of graduate work, and consent of the instructor and Program director.

JDST 697: DIRECTED READING IN JEWISH STUDIES (2-4 CREDITS)


Reading in areas of selected by the instructor and the student. No more than 6 units of 697 and 797 may be applied toward a degree. Prerequisites: Graduate standing, 18 units of graduate work, consent of the instructor and program director.

JDST 797: DIRECTED INDIVIDUAL RESEARCH IN JEWISH STUDIES (3 CREDITS)


Research and reading with a topic to be selected by the instructor and the student. No more than 6 units of  697 and 797 may be applied toward a degree. Prerequisites: Graduate standing and 18 units of JDST core courses.

JDST 897: MASTER’S THESIS (6 CREDITS)


Thesis research in Jewish Studies. An original investigation, using research methods and design, of a research problem. Students who have completed all other course requirements for the master’s degree must register for JDST 897 for six units or take JDST 898 for three units for two consecutive semesters following completion of their didactic coursework. Prerequisite: Permission of graduate program director.

JDST 898: MASTER’S THESIS (3 CREDITS)

Thesis research in Jewish Studies. This is the previous course (897), taken over two consecutive semesters. Prerequisite: Permit from graduate program director.

JDST 899: MASTER’S THESIS CONTINUUM (1 CREDIT)


Continuation of thesis work. Prerequisite: 6 units of Thesis 897 or 898.

MONTHLY SEMINARS AND INTERNSHIPS


ILPD 797: SUPERVISED ADMINISTRATION INTERNSHIP


Dr. Hana Bor


Students enrolled in the MAJE administrative track are required to complete a
supervised administrative internship. The internship is designed to develop educational vision, leadership skills and practices based on students’ individualized interests. The internship will enable students to develop the skills necessary for professional growth in Jewish educational administration.

EDUC 797: SUPERVISED TEACHING INTERNSHIP


Dr. Hana Bor


Students enrolled in the MAJE teaching track are required to complete a
supervised teaching internship. The internship will be individualized, enabling each student to develop the skills necessary for professional growth in a variety of Jewish institutions. Dr. Hana Bor will coordinate student internships.


JCS 618: SUPERVISED JEWISH COMMUNAL SERVICE INTERNSHIP


Dr. Hana Bor


Students enrolled in the MAJCS program are required to complete a supervised field internship. This internship is carefully designed to develop leadership skills necessary to become a Jewish Communal professional. The internship will enable students to develop the skills necessary for professional growth and adhere to the individual goals. Students must complete a minimum of two full days per week in Jewish institution or organization [ex: The Associated, or other Jewish Federations, JCC etc.]

JCS 614: JEWISH COMMUNAL SERVICE PRACTICUM SEMINAR --*YEAR-LONG/1-CREDIT


Dr. Hana Bor


The monthly practicum seminar provides an opportunity for Master of Arts in Jewish Communal Service [MAJCS] students to study with their peers and professional leaders. Theoretical and practical aspects of contemporary issues are discussed as well as relations with lay leaders; and community visionaries. This seminar integrates the studies and professional development to enable students to be confident as they embark on their careers. Participation in the seminar is mandatory for a minimum of two years.

JCS 618: SUPERVISED JEWISH COMMUNAL SERVICE INTERNSHIP (3 CREDITS)

Dr. Hana Bor


Students enrolled in the MAJCS program are required to complete a supervised field internship. This internship is carefully designed to develop leadership skills necessary to become a Jewish Communal professional. The internship will enable students to develop the skills necessary for professional growth and adhere to the individual goals. Students must complete a minimum of two full days per week in Jewish institution or organization [ex: The Associated, or other Jewish Federations, JCC etc.]

JDST 719: JEWISH STUDIES SEMINAR --*YEAR-LONG/1-CREDIT


Dr. Susanna Garfein


The seminar will be held three evenings each semester and be a combination of scheduled lectures and faculty and student presentations. (Required of all Masters Students)

JDST 890: DOCTORAL SEMINAR *YEAR-LONG/1-CREDIT

Dr. Shimon Shokek


The seminar will be held three evenings each semester and be a combination of scheduled lectures and faculty and student presentations. (Required of all doctoral students)