FALL 2011 COURSE OFFERINGS

IN JUDAIC STUDIES, JEWISH COMMUNAL SERVICE

AND JEWISH EDUCATION AT TOWSON UNIVERSITY

Biblical and Ancient near eastern Civilizations

JDST 600:  Biblical Literature and Civilization  (Graduate Only)

Dr. Barry M. Gittlen

Monday, 7:00-9:40pm

The major literary product of Israelite civilization, the Bible is the primary vehicle for the understanding of this civilization.  Critical examination of the Bible, its literature, and its cultural setting produces a more informed knowledge of literary form, style and function in ancient Israel; an intelligent understanding of Israel’s literature, history and civilization during the first millennium B.C.E.; and insight into Israel’s religious ideas, institutions and theology which are reflected in this great literature. 

RLST 370/570:  Special Topics  in Religious Studies - Exploring Exodus (Graduate and Undergraduate)

Dr. Barry M. Gittlen

Thursday, 3:30 – 6:10 pm 

From murder to manna to Mt. Sinai, ancient Israel’s national liberation saga, the Book of Exodus, reverberates within many more recent liberation movements down to today.  Through careful reading, students will gain new and deeper understanding and appreciation of the literary, social, theological and historical aspects of the narrative and its ancient context.

RLST 201: Introduction to the Hebrew Bible/ Old Testament

Dr. Susanna Garfein

Tuesdays and Thursdays, 12:30-1:45

The Hebrew Bible or Old Testament is arguably the most read text in the history of civilization. It may also be the most misread. This course introduces you to the Old Testament (or Tanakh as Jews refer to it) and the culture that produced it. This course delivers a broad overview of the history and literature of the Bible, surveying various biblical books and offering not only a background to the biblical period but also to the structure of biblical literature and its interpretation. (meets Gen Ed II.C.1 requirement and Core Curriculum area 5)

RLST 103:  Exploring Biblical Archaeology (Undergraduate)

Dr. Barry M. Gittlen

Tuesday and Thursday, 2:00 – 3:15 pm

Explores and develops the archaeological evidence for Biblical Israel and instructs on how to understand the material remnants of ancient life (belief and practice).

Jewish History

JDST 650:  Special Topics in Jewish Studies-Medieval Jewish History

Dr. Benjamin Fisher

Tuesday, 7:00-9:40 pm

This course provides an examination of the major factors that shaped Jewish life in the medieval period. Topics covered include: the relationship between the Jews and the Church and State; the economic role of the Jews in medieval Europe; popular images of Jews; the autonomous Jewish community and its functions; and the development of Rabbinic learning Europe.

survey in European Jewish History (undergraduate)

Dr. Benjamin Fisher

survey in European History

 Dr. Benjamin Fisher

HIST 462/HIST 588    The Holocaust in Historical and Comparative Perspective (Graduate and Undergraduate)


Dr. Valerie Thaler

Tuesday and Thursday, 11:00 am-12:15 pm
This course will examine the Holocaust, beginning with a survey of the history of anti-Semitism in Europe. We will examine political, cultural, social and psychological factors which contributed to the rise of Nazi Germany, and the genocide of European Jewry that took place between 1939 and 1945. Other topics to be considered include the role of propaganda and authority in German society; bystanders and rescuers, spiritual and physical resistance, and the Holocaust in historical memory as well as contemporary representation. The Holocaust will also be considered alongside other examples of genocide in the 20th century.

JDST 610: Diaspora Jewish Communities


Dr. Valerie Thaler

Wednesday, 7:00 - 9:40 pm
This course explores Jewish communities around the world, some large and well-known, and others smaller and less well-understood. It examines the recent history of each Jewish community, as well as contemporary issues and concerns. Of critical importance is the way in which Jewish identity is defined differently in each cultural context.

jewish Thought and Mysticism

RLST 370/ JDST 570:  Ethics and Mysticism in Judaism and Islam: A Jewish-Sufi Dialogue

Dr. Shimon Shokek

Tuesday & Thursday, 12:30-1:45 pm

This course examines selected classical works that have shaped the foundations of ethics and mysticism in Judaism and Islam. The course will explore the focal work of Jewish ethics, The Duties of the Heart; the magnum opus of Jewish mysticism, The Zohar; the influential treatise of Islamic Sufism, The Alchemy of Happiness; and the central composition of Islamic mysticism, The Journey to the Lord of Power. The analysis will examine similarities and differences between the ethical and mystical teachings of Judaism and Islam. Among the topics to be included in the survey are the Unity of God, Worship and Devotion, Religious Music and Ecstatic Dancing, Abstinence and Trust in God, Love and Fear of God, Mystical Experience, Ethical Paths and Religious Happiness.

 

RLST 357 /JDST557:  Ethics and Religion in the Jewish-Christian Tradition

Dr. Shimon Shokek

Monday & Wednesday, 2:00-3:15 pm

This course examines classical texts that have shaped the foundations of ethics in the Jewish-Christian tradition.  The course will discuss major ethical predicaments, such as the idea of the mean, human responsibility, human suffering, happiness and wisdom, free will, repentance and forgiveness, saintliness and humility, purity and holiness.  The survey will include three parts: [1] ethics from classical sources of Greek philosophy that inspired the Jewish-Christian tradition, [2[ethics from classical sources of Judaism, and [3] ethics from classical sources of Christianity.

RLST 206:  History, Scriptures, Doctrines, Practices and Interactions of the Three Monotheistic Religions: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam

Dr. Shimon Shokek

Monday & Wednesday, 3:30 - 4:45 pm

This course introduces major themes in the history, scriptures, doctrines, and practices of the three monotheistic religions: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. The course will explore the theological and philosophical meanings of monotheism, religious authority, worship and ritual, ethics, philosophy, and mysticism in the framework of these three monotheistic religions. Special emphasis will be put on similarities and differences that have shaped the identity of each of these three religions.

 

Rabbinic History and Literature

RLST 310/510:  The Jew Confronts the Modern World: Jewish Law and Ethics

Dr. Barry Freundel

Thursday, 7:00 - 9:40 pm

This course applies the long tradition of Jewish legal and ethical philosophical thinking to cutting edge issues. Students will explore the basic structure and methodology of Jewish law and discuss how it responds to the challenges of contemporary technology, society, family structures, and interpersonal relationships. The course will address modern topics such as choosing the gender of your child, the “Just War”, environmental ethics, and sexual ethics. We will draw upon classic Jewish texts (in English translation) as well as the work of contemporary Jewish thinkers from different denominations.

RLST 210: Introduction to Judaism   

Dr. Barry Freundel

Tuesday and Thursday, 2:00 - 3:15 pm

Students will leave this course with a thorough understanding of a unique and tenacious people. We begin by exploring Jewish culture, ethnicity, nationality, religion, and values; move on to studying the intellectual life of the Jew; and conclude with an exploration of the religion’s rituals and symbols. Throughout the semester, we will focus on the dynamics of Judaism as a religious "tradition," in which innovation and change emerges through asserting continuity with the past. 

TSEM.102.030: Towson Seminar - The Object is the Object

Dr. Barry Freundel

Thursday, 12:30 – 1:45 pm

This course will explore the importance of rituals and symbolic objects in general and for Judaism specifically. Students will examine Jewish ritual objects such as the shofar, mezuzah, tefillin, Seder plate, and many others. Starting with the Biblical origins of these objects, and moving through history to the present day, this class will trace the development of these ritual objects and how they are currently understood and manufactured. Students will leave this course with an understanding of the role that symbolic objects play in creating continuity and in elevating the mundane to the sacred.

 

 

Hebrew Language and Literature

HEB 103/JDST 544:  Biblical Hebrew I  [grad and undergrad)

Heath Dewrell

Tuesday and Thursday, 3:30-4:45 (3 credits)

This course is an introduction to Hebrew with emphasis on the grammar, vocabulary, syntax and style of Classical Hebrew. This course teaches the fundamentals of Hebrew language as well as prepares students to read and translate classical Hebrew texts. This course serves as the foundation for the students’ continued studies of the classical Hebrew of the Hebrew Bible and rabbinic texts as well as the Hebrew of the contemporary idiom. (Meets Core Area 5 requirement)

HEB 203/ JDST 545:  Biblical Hebrew III (grad and undergrad)

Dr. Susanna Garfein

Tuesday and Thursday, 2:00-3:15 pm (3 credits)

This course is for students who have completed 6 credits of Classical Hebrew. Students will continue their study of classical Hebrew texts with concentration on more complicated structures of Hebrew grammar, morphology, syntax, and vocabulary.

Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor. (Meets Core Area 5 Requirement)

JDST 641: Classical Hebrew Language and Literature: 2 Samuel

Dr. Susanna Garfein

Tuesdays, 4:00-6:40

This course surveys the literature of 2 Samuel.  Emphasis is placed on accurate translation; more advanced grammar, intensive study of Biblical vocabulary and the reading of the prose portions of the Hebrew Bible.   In addition to accurate translation of the Hebrew Bible, this course will introduce various methods of critical interpretation needed for the academic study of the Hebrew Bible. This course is designed for students who have completed twelve credits of Biblical Hebrew or possess equivalent knowledge. (Hebrew Language and Literature Core)

HEB 101:  Modern Hebrew I (3 credits) (Hebrew Requirement)

Dr. Eyal Bor

Tuesday and Thursday, 12:30 -1:45 pm

This course is an introduction to the fundamental structure of Modern Hebrew grammar. The foundation for future comprehension will be established through basic language skills such as reading, writing, conversation and reading comprehension. Students will learn basic communication skills as well as the necessary vocabulary for reading of Modern Hebrew texts.

HEB 202/ JDST 542:  Modern Hebrew III (3 credits) (Hebrew Requirement)

Dr. Eyal Bor

Tuesday and Thursday, 2:00-3:15 pm

This course is designed for students who have completed 6 credits of Modern Hebrew. Students will learn to recognize and use new and more complicated structures of Hebrew grammar and morphology as well as acquire vocabulary for more advanced reading of Modern Hebrew texts and conversation. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor

JEWISH COMMUNAL SERVICE

ILPD 606/ JCS 612: STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT OF JEWISH ORGANIZATIONS: MATERIAL RESOURCES

Dr. Hana Bor

Fridays 9:30 am - 12:00 pm

ILPD 739: LEADERSHIP THEORY AND PRACTICE

Dr. Hana Bor

Thursdays 5:00 - 7:30  

This course will focus on the theoretical and application of leadership concepts, principles, practices, and competencies. Theory and practice are integrated to apply these conceptual models of leadership in the education context; and examine the concept of the school as a learning organization and its implications for the practice of educational leadership.

EDUC 648: TEACHING CLASSICAL JEWISH TEXT: A DEVELOPMENTAL APPROACH

 Dr. Rebecca Shargel

 Wednesdays, 4:20 PM to 7:00 PM - Hawkins Hall 206

 How do children make sense of ancient stories? Drawing from psychological and literary theory, students will come to new understandings of how children understand textual material. Students will learn innovative strategies to reach the emotional and spiritual needs of children and adolescents through textual study.

EDUC 606: FROM VISION TO PRACTICE IN THE JEWISH SCHOOL

Dr. Rebecca Shargel

Wednesday 7:00-9:40 pm

In this course you will study the role of vision in Jewish schools and look at competing Jewish educational visions. You will also compare philosophical, school-wide visions to personal, teacher-centered visions, drawing from both Jewish and general educational literature. To apply this knowledge, you will critically examine local Jewish schools to see the translation of the vision and mission into practice.

EDUC 605: RESEARCH & TECHNOLOGY IN EDUCATION (GENERAL TOWSON EDUCATION COURSE)

Dr. Rebecca Shargel

Wednesday 4:20-6:50 pm

 

INDEPENDENT STUDIES, INTERNSHIPS, THESIS AND DISSERTATION WRITING

JCS 618: SUPERVISED JEWISH COMMUNAL SERVICE INTERNSHIP

Dr. Hana Bor

 Students enrolled in the MAJCS program are required to complete a supervised field internship. This internship is carefully designed to develop leadership skills necessary to become a Jewish Communal professional. The internship will enable students to develop the skills necessary for professional growth and adhere to the individual goals. Students must complete a minimum of two full days per week in Jewish institution or organization (ex: The Associated, or other Jewish Federations, JCC etc.).

ILPD 797: SUPERVISED ADMINISTRATION INTERNSHIP

 Dr. Hana Bor

Students enrolled in the MAJE administrative track are required to complete a supervised administrative internship. The internship is designed to develop educational vision, leadership skills and practices based on students’ individualized interests. The internship will enable students to develop the skills necessary for professional growth in Jewish educational administration.

EDUC 797: SUPERVISED TEACHING INTERNSHIP

Dr. Hana Bor

Students enrolled in the MAJE teaching track are required to complete a supervised teaching internship. The internship will be individualized, enabling each student to develop the skills necessary for professional growth in a variety of Jewish institutions. Dr. Hana Bor will coordinate student internships.

JDST 897: MASTER’S THESIS (6 CREDITS)

Thesis research in Jewish Studies. An original investigation, using research methods and design, of a research problem. Students who have completed all other course requirements for the master’s degree must register for JDST 897 for six units or take JDST 898 for three units for two consecutive semesters following completion of their didactic coursework. Prerequisite: Permission of graduate program director.

Section 001—Dr. Gittlen

Section 002 – Dr. Garfein

Section 003—Dr. Thaler

Section 004 – Dr. Shokek

Section 005—Dr. Freundel

JDST 898: MASTER’S THESIS (3 CREDITS)

Thesis research in Jewish Studies. Prerequisite: Permission of graduate program director.

Section 001—Dr. Gittlen

Section 002 – Dr. Garfein

Section 003—Dr. Thaler

Section 004 – Dr. Shokek

Section 005—Dr. Freundel

JDST 899: MASTER’S THESIS CONTINUUM (1 CREDIT)

Continuation of thesis work. Prerequisite: 6 units of These  897 or 898.

Section 001—Dr. Gittlen

Section 002 – Dr. Garfein

Section 003—Dr. Thale

Section 004 – Dr. Shokek

Section 005—Dr. Freundel

JDST 999: DOCTORAL CONTINUUM (1 CREDIT)

Section 001—Dr. Gittlen

Section 002 – Dr. Garfein

Section 003—Dr. Thaler

Section 004 – Dr. Shokek

Section 005—Dr. Freundel

MONTHLY SEMINARS AND INTERNSHIPS

EDUC 794/ JCS 614 PRACTICUM (1/2 OF 1 CREDIT)

Fridays 12:00 - 2:00 [once a month] - Hawkins Hall

JDST 719: MA JEWISH STUDIES SEMINAR -- *YEAR-LONG/1-CREDIT

Dr. Valerie Thaler

Three Selected Wednesdays, 5:00 - 6:45 pm (LA 4240)

This course enables students working on their Master’s in Jewish Studies the opportunity to meet, hear presentations of MA thesis research, and discuss related issues and problems with their peers. (Required of all MAJS Students)

JDST 890: DOCTORAL SEMINAR *YEAR-LONG/1-CREDIT

Dr. Shimon Shokek

Three Selected Tuesdays, 5:00-6:30 (LA 3216)

This course enables students working on their PhD in Jewish Studies the opportunity to meet, hear

presentations of PhD dissertation research, and discuss related issues and problems with their peers

(Required of all doctoral students)

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