SPRING 2011 COURSE OFFERINGIN
JUDAIC STUDIES,JEWISH COMMUNA,
SERVICEAND JEWISH EDUCATION
AT TOWSON UNIVERSITY

BIBLICAL AND ANCIENT NEAR EASTERN CIVILIZATIONS

JDST 600: BIBLICAL LITERATURE AND CIVILIZATION (GRADUATE ONLY)

Dr. Barry M. Gittlen

Monday, 7:00-9:40pm (Rockville)

The major literary product of Israelite civilization, the Bible is the primary vehicle for the understanding of this civilization. Critical examination of the Bible, its literature, and its cultural setting produces a more informed knowledge of literary form, style and function in ancient Israel; an intelligent understanding of Israel's literature, history and civilization during the first millennium B.C.E.; and insight into Israel’s religious ideas, institutions and theology which are reflected in this great literature.

RLST 331/531: EXPLORING GENESIS (GRADUATE AND UNDERGRADUATE)

Dr. Barry M. Gittlen

Tuesday and Thursday, 2:00-3:15 pm

Through careful reading, this course explores Israelite culture and thought within and behind the Biblical Book of Genesis as well as the relationship to the ancient Near Eastern literary and archaeological context.Develops new understandings of the often discussed but rarely deeply read book.

RLST 103: EXPLORING BIBLICAL ARCHAEOLOGY (UNDERGRADUATE)

Dr. Barry M. Gittlen

Tuesday and Thursday, 9:30-10:45am

Explores and develops the archaeological evidence for Biblical Israel and instructs on how to understand the material remnants of ancient life (belief and practice).

 

JEWISH HISTORY

HIST482/ 590: AMERICAN JEWISH HISTORY FROM 1654 TO THE PRESENT (GRADUATE AND

UNDERGRADUATE)

Dr. Valerie Thaler

Wednesday, 7:00-9:40 pm

A comprehensive survey of the history of the American Jewish community from the time of their arrival in the United States to the start of the 21st century.

 

JEWISH THOUGHT AND MYSTICISM

JDST 666: INTRODUCTION TO JEWISH THOUGHT (GRADUATE ONLY)

Dr. Shimon Shokek

Tuesday, 7:00-9:40 pm

This course examines the religious and historical developments of Jewish thought of the last two thousand years. The course will focus on selected works of prominent Jewish philosophers, mystics, and ethical writers who shaped Jewish thought and created focal ideological changes in Jewish theology. The survey will introduce religious predicaments that are central to Jewish life, such as: exile and redemption, religious practices and beliefs, mysticism and intellectuality, Jewish law, Jewish mythology and symbolism, moral responsibility and divine authority. An exploration of the basic terminology that is used in the literary research of the history of ideas will be included in the survey.

RLST 370/557: ETHICS AND RELIGION IN THE JEWISH-CHRISTIAN TRADITION (GRADUATE AND

UNDERGRADUATE)

Dr. Shimon Shokek

Monday and Wednesday, 2:00-3:15 pm

This course examines classical texts that have shaped the foundations of ethics in the Jewish-Christian tradition. The course will discuss major ethical predicaments, such as the idea of the mean, human responsibility, human suffering, happiness and wisdom, free will, repentance and forgiveness, saintliness and humility, purity and holiness. The survey will include three parts: [1] ethics from classical sources of Greek philosophy that inspired the Jewish-Christian tradition, [2]ethics from classical sources of Judaism, and  ethics from classical sources of Christianity.

 

RLST 206: JUDAISM, CHRISTIANITY, AND ISLAM (UNDERGRADUATE – GENED II.C.3)

Dr. Shimon Shokek

Monday and Wednesday, 3:30-4:45 pm

This course introduces major themes in the history, scriptures, doctrines, and practices of the three monotheistic religions: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. The course will explore the theological and philosophical meanings of monotheism, religious authority, worship and ritual, ethics, philosophy, and mysticism in the framework of these three monotheistic religions. Special emphasis will be put on similarities and differences that have shaped the identity of each of these three religions

 

RABBINIC HISTORY AND LITERATURE

JDST680: INTRODUCTION TO RABBINIC LITERATURE AND HISTORY (GRADUATE ONLY)

Dr. Barry Freundel

Thursday 7:00 – 9:40 p.m.

The Rabbinic period (c. 516 BCE-c. 634 CE.), is the foundational era for all contemporary expressions of Judaism. In this course we will explore the history, literature and major personalities of that period from the return of the Jews from the Babylonian exile until the Arab conquest of Palestine. For anyone interested in understanding contemporary Judaism in its various expressions this is an important and essential prerequisite to that understanding; while for those interested in ancient Jewish history or Rabbinic law and literature this study is absolutely essential.

RLST 370/570: THE REMARKABLE HISTORY OF JEWISH PRAYER (GRADUATE AND UNDERGRADUATE)

Dr. Barry Freundel

Thursday 4:20-7:00pm

In this course, we will examine how many Jewish prayers came to be recited as they are today. If one looks at a prayer book, it does not display the many influences that shaped it. We will explore the question of how it was shaped and, along the way, we will meet great philosophical debates, remarkable claims that a Jewish pope impacted the prayer book, internal struggles about the core of Jewish beliefs, questions of how people living in this world might be able to impact those who have passed on, and stories of mystics as they journey through heaven to come closer to God.

 

HEBREW LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE

JDST 545/ HEBR 104: BIBLICAL HEBREW II (HEBREW REQUIREMENT –GENED IID)

Dr. Susanna Garfein

Tuesday and Thursday, 2:00-3:15

This course is the continuation of JDST 544, the introduction to the fundamentals of Hebrew language. This course serves as the foundation for continued studies of the classical Hebrew contained in the Hebrew Bible and rabbinic texts as well as the Hebrew of the contemporary idiom. During the course of the semester selections from the Hebrew Bible, varying in time period and genre will be read. After the completion of JDST 545, the student will be prepared to read simple Classical texts with the aid of a lexicon.

JDST 547/ HEBR 204: BIBLICAL HEBREW IV (3 CREDITS) (HEBREW REQUIREMENT –GENED IID)

Dr. Susanna Garfein

Tuesday and Thursday, 3:30-4:45 pm

The primary purpose of this course is to reinforce and expand your existing knowledge of Biblical Hebrew. We will work towards this goal in the best way possible, by reading from the Biblical text. In addition to reading texts together in class we will systematically review Biblical Hebrew grammar and continue to build vocabulary. Finally, we will explore the many literary features of Biblical Hebrew prose and poetry.

HEBR 102: MODERN HEBREW II (3 CREDITS) (HEBREW REQUIREMENT –GEN ED IID)

Dr. Eyal Bor

Tuesday and Thursday, 12:30 -1:45 pm

An introduction to Hebrew. Speaking, reading, and writing, the development of conversational ability, free composition, and translation from English to Hebrew. GenEd II.D. HEBR 101 is a prerequisite to HEBR 102.

HEBR 202: MODERN HEBREW IV (3 CREDITS) (HEBREW REQUIREMENT—GEN ED II D)

Dr. Eyal Bor

Tuesday and Thursday, 2:00-3:15 pm

A continued review of grammatical structure with emphasis on conversational and reading fluency. Vocabulary building, composition and reading and discussion of selected outside readings. HEBR 201 is a prerequisite to HEBR 202.

 

JEWISH COMMUNAL SERVICE

ILPD 605/ JCS 611: MANAGEMENT OF HUMAN SERVICES: LEADERSHIP & SUPERVISION

Dr. Hana Bor

Fridays 9:30 AM - 11:30 AM - Hawkins Hall

Begin to develop management expertise for working in nonprofit Jewish organizations. This course focuses on leadership style, interpersonal relations, mission statements, shared vision, executive roles, working with committees, communities and colleagues.

 

JEWISH EDUCATION

EDUC 648: TEACHING CLASSICAL JEWISH TEXT: A DEVELOPMENTAL APPROACH

Dr. Rebecca Shargel

Wednesdays, 4:20 PM to 7:00 PM - Hawkins Hall 206

How do children make sense of ancient stories? Drawing from psychological and literary theory, students will come to new understandings of how children understand textual material. Students will learn innovative strategies to reach the emotional and spiritual needs of children and adolescents through textual study.

EDUC 764: QUALITATIVE RESEARCH IN JEWISH EDUCATION

Dr. Rebecca Shargel

Wednesdays, 7:00 PM to 9:40 PM - Hawkins Hall 206

This course introduces qualitative research methods with a focus on prior studies carried out in schools. Through a field-based approach each student will explore a topic of personal interest in Jewish education.

ILPD 739: LEADERSHIP THEORY AND PRACTICE

Dr. Hana Bor

Thursdays 5:00 - 7:30 - CCBC/ Hunt Valley

This course will focus on the theoretical and application of leadership concepts, principles, practices, and competencies. Theory and practice are integrated to apply these conceptual models of leadership in the education context; and examine the concept of the school as a learning organization and its implications for the practice of educational leadership.

 

INDEPENDENT STUDIES, INTERNSHIPS, THESIS AND DISSERTATION WRITING

JCS 618: SUPERVISED JEWISH COMMUNAL SERVICE INTERNSHIP

Dr. Hana Bor

Students enrolled in the MAJCS program are required to complete a supervised field internship. This internship is carefully designed to develop leadership skills necessary to become a Jewish Communal professional. The internship will enable students to develop the skills necessary for professional growth and adhere to the individual goals. Students must complete a minimum of two full days per week in Jewish institution or organization (ex: The Associated, or other Jewish Federations, JCC etc.).

ILPD 797: SUPERVISED ADMINISTRATION INTERNSHIP

Dr. Hana Bor

Students enrolled in the MAJE administrative track are required to complete a supervised administrative internship. The internship is designed to develop educational vision, leadership skills and practices based on students’ individualized interests. The internship will enable students to develop the skills necessary for professional growth in Jewish educational administration.

EDUC 797: SUPERVISED TEACHING INTERNSHIP

Dr. Hana Bor

Students enrolled in the MAJE teaching track are required to complete a supervised teaching internship. The internship will be individualized, enabling each student to develop the skills necessary for professional growth in a variety of Jewish institutions. Dr. Hana Bor will coordinate student internships.

JDST 897: MASTER’S THESIS (6 CREDITS)

Thesis research in Jewish Studies. An original investigation, using research methods and design, of a research problem. Students who have completed all other course requirements for the master’s degree must register for JDST 897 for six units or take JDST 898 for three units for two consecutive semesters following completion of their didactic coursework. Prerequisite: Permission of graduate program director.

JDST 898: MASTER’S THESIS (3 CREDITS)

Thesis research in Jewish Studies. Prerequisite: Permission of graduate program director.

Section 001—Dr. Gittlen

Section 002 – Dr. Garfein

Section 003—Dr. Thaler

Section 004 – Dr. Shokek

Section 005—Dr. Freundel

JDST 899: MASTER’S THESIS CONTINUUM (1 CREDIT)

Continuation of thesis work. Prerequisite: 6 units of Thesis 897 or 898.

Section 001—Dr. Gittlen

Section 002 – Dr. Garfein

Section 003—Dr. Thaler

Section 004 – Dr. Shokek

Section 005—Dr. Freundel

JDST 999: DOCTORAL CONTINUUM (1 CREDIT)

Section 001—Dr. Gittlen

Section 002 – Dr. Garfein

Section 003—Dr. Thaler

Section 004 – Dr. Shokek

Section 005—Dr. Freundel

 

MONTHLY SEMINARS AND INTERNSHIPS

EDUC 795/ JCS 614 PRACTICUM (1 CREDIT CONTINUES FROM FALL SEMESTER)

Fridays 12:00 - 2:00 [once a month] - Hawkins Hall

 

JDST 719: MA JEWISH STUDIES SEMINAR -- *YEAR-LONG/1-CREDIT

Dr. Susanna Garfein

Three Selected Dates, 5:30-7:00 pm

This course enables students working on their Master’s in Jewish Studies the opportunity to meet, hear presentations of MA thesis research, and discuss related issues and problems with their peers. (Required of all MAJS Students)

 

JDST 890: DOCTORAL SEMINAR *YEAR-LONG/1-CREDIT

Dr. Shimon Shokek

Three Selected Tuesdays, 5:00-6:30

This course enables students working on their PhD in Jewish Studies the opportunity to meet, hear presentations of PhD dissertation research, and discuss related issues and problems with their peers.(Required of all doctoral students)