Faculty kudos

 

College of Fine Arts and Communication

Phillip Collister, Music, has been asked by The National Opera Association (NOA) to direct two chamber operas as part of a new works competition at the January 2009 national convention being held in Arlington, Va., Jan. 8-11.  The two works, The Beautiful Bridegroom by Daniel Shore and A Bird In Your Ear by David Bruce will be presented before a jury panel of opera professionals from across the country. The winning opera will then be presented fully staged with orchestra at the 2010 NOA convention in Atlanta. Many of the roles in both operas are being performed by TU students and faculty, including voice faculty Theresa Bickham, Leah Inger and Tony Boutte.

College of Health Professions

Lisa Fagan, Occupational Therapy and Occupational Science, won first place as the consultant in a nursing home design competition in the rural category of the Green House Charette, a project funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and NCB Capital Impact.

S. Maggie Reitz, Occupational Therapy and Occupational Science, was the invited speaker at the plenary session of the 2008 Internatinal Occupational Therapy Conference in Guangzhou, China, Nov. 13-17. Her presentation was titled, "American Occupational Therapists' Actions During and After Hurricane Katrina."

Andrea B. Sherwin, Occupational Therapy and Occupational Science, presented a paper, "Advocacy Actions by Parents Raising a Child with Special Needs: is There Occupational Balance?" at the seventh annual Research Conference of the Society for the Study of Occupation: USA in Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., in October.

Rondalyn Whitney, Occupational Therapy and Occupational Science, is the author of a book, Nonverbal Learring Disorder, Understanding and Coping with NLD and Asperger's, What Parents Need to Know, published by Perigee. In addition, she was the invited guest speaker at the Prader Willi Syndrome conference in Sacramento, Calif., on Nov. 8.

Jenna C. Yeager and Janet V. DeLany, Occupational Therapy and Occupational Science, presented a paper co-authored with Marybeth Merryman and Sonia Lawson titled "Exerience Sampling Method (ESM) and the Study of Occupation" at the seventh annual Research Conference of the Society for the Study of Occupation: USA in Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., in October.

Marybeth Merryman
, Occupational Therapy and Occupational Science, presented a poster co-authored with Karen Goldrich Eskow, chairperson, Department of Family Studies, titled "Action Research: A Bridge to Inform Practice" at the seventh annual Research Conference of the Society for the Study of Occupation: USA in Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., in October.

College of Liberal Arts

Alan Britt, English, published a poem in the bilingual anthology Transatlantic Steamer, just released from Hofstra University Press/ Fondo Editorial Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, 2008. In addition, he published a poem in a recent issue of Queen's Quarterly (Canada), four poems in a recent issue of Heeltap and four poems in recent issue of Darkling.

Akim Reinhardt, History, traveled to the Center for Great Plains Studies at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln in September to accept the 2008 Great Plains Distinguished Book Prize for Ruling Pine Ridge: Ogala Lakota Politics from the IRA to Wounded Knee, published in May 2007 by Texas Tech University Press. He also delivered the center’s annual Paul Olson Lecture, which he titled, “American Colony: Pine Ridge Reservation in the 20th Century.” 

Fisher College of Science and Mathematics

Honi Bamberger, Mathematics, conducted an afternoon mathematics workshop for the middle and upper school teachers at The Summit School, in Edgewater, Md., on Oct. 8. Teachers learned new ways to incorporate writing into their mathematics program.

Jay Nelson, Biological Sciences, consulted for The National Aquarium in Baltimore’s major exhibit renovation of the third floor of the Aquarium that deals with adaptations. The principal exhibit theme will be that animals survive through adaptation and that humans are changing the environment faster than animals can adapt to those changes.