Jess & Mildred Fisher College of Science & Mathematics


Department of Mathematics

Faculty Research and Scholarship

Mathematics Education

Dr. Honi J. Bambarger's current research interests continue to be the effect that professional development has on the attitudes and teaching techniques of classroom teachers and the effect that this has on the achievement and attitudes of students.  Much of this work is being done in high poverty schools, and school systems   Dr. Bamberger is currently in her seventh year of a research study that began in Mobile, Alabama and is now being replicated in Hoover and Decatur, Alabama   The Mobile Mathematics Initiative (MMI) is a collaborative effort between the Mobile Area Education Foundation, the University of South Alabama, and the professional development team, led by Dr. Bamberger.

Some of Dr. Bamberger's publications include:

  • Honi J. Bamberger, Christine Oberdorf and Karen Schultz-Ferrell, Math Misconceptions: From Misunderstanding to Deep Understanding, Heinemann Publications, Portsmouth, NH, September 2010.
  • Honi J. Bamberger and Christine Oberdorf, Activities to Undo Math Misconceptions, Grades 3–5, Heinemann Publications, Portsmouth, NH, September 2010.
  • Honi J. Bamberger and Karen Schultz-Ferrell, Activities to Undo Math Misconceptions, PreK–Grade 2, Heinemann Publications, Portsmouth, NH, September 2010.
  • Honi Bamberger, Felice Shore, Judith Macks, R. Michael Krach and Todd Moyer, An example of professional staff development in an urban setting, The Ohio Journal of School Mathematics (Spring 2009).

Dr. Bamberger received the following grants:

  • Building Capacity for Continuous Improvement Program for the Area 1 Title 1 K–8 Schools, with R. Michael Krach and Todd Moyer, from the Baltimore City Public School System (2005–2006).

Dr. Bamberger also has presented papers at many conferences and meetings of some of which are listed below:

  • “Creating mathematicians out of the littlest of learner”s, National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) Regional Conference, Atlantic City, New Jersey, October 20, 2006.
  • “Connecting literature and writing into your mathematics program”, Weekend Institute, Newark, New Jersey, February 2006.


Dr. Diana Cheng's current research interests are in the fields of middle school students' development of early algebraic reasoning and preservice teachers' development of mathematical knowledge for teaching. Dr. Cheng is also interested in ways to use interesting contexts to help middle school students become motivated to learn mathematics. Dr. Cheng is a member of the 2011 cohort of the Service, Teaching and Research program for early career mathematics teacher educators, funded by the National Science Foundation.

Some of Dr. Cheng's publications include:

  • Cheng, Diana, An article "Making algebra more accessible:how steep can it be for teachers", published in Cultures of Teacher Education, Analytrics. Strasbourg, France, (to appear).
  • Cheng, D. and Sabinin, P., Transition from additive to proportional reasoning in preparation for learning about slope, American Educational Research Association 2009 Annual Meeting Online Repository, (2009).

Some of Dr. Cheng's presentations at conferences include:

  • “Maintaining cognitive demands of tasks through small group discussions in preservice elementary mathematics classrooms”, 33rd Annual Conference of the North American Chapter of the International Group Conference, Reno, Nevada, 2011 [with S. Chapin and Z. Feldman].
  • “Designing materials to support the learning of K-6 mathematics teacher educators”, Association of Mathematics Teacher Educators Conference, Irvine, California, 2011 [with D. Ball, H. Bass, L. Sleep, K. Suzuka, M. Thames, S. Chapin, Z. Feldman and M. Chedister].
  • “Using mathematical tasks and discourse-based instruction to promote elementary teacher knowledge”, Association of Mathematics Teacher Educators Conference, Irvine, California, 2011 [with Z. Feldman, M. Chedister and S. Chapin].
  •  “The use of discourse in developing prospective teachers' mathematical justifications”, National Council of Teachers of Mathematics Research Presession, Indianapolis, Indiana, 2011 [with M. Chedister, S. Chapin, Z. Feldman and J. Bunn].
  •  “Sporting math”, National Council of Teachers of Mathematics Research Presession, Indianapolis, Indiana, 2011 [with J. Bunn].
  • “The mathematics behind sports”, National Council of Teachers of Mathematics Regional Conference and Exposition, Atlantic City, New Jersey, 2011 [with J. Bunn].
  • “Proportional reasoning: building understanding beyond cross products”, National Council of Teachers of Mathematics Regional Conference and Exposition, St. Louis, Misouri, 2011 [with J. Bunn].
  • “How steep it is! Connecting angle and algebraic slope”, National Council of Teachers of Mathematics Annual Meeting, San Diego, California, 2010.
  • “Seventh graders' reasoning on a comparison task in the context of steepness”, 2nd Paris International Conference on Education, Economy, and Society, Paris, France, 2010 [with P. Sabinin].


Dr. Linda Cooper's current research interest is in the field of teaching statistics in K–16 education.

Some of Dr. Cooper's publications include:

  • Linda Cooper, Sandy Spitzer and Ming Tomayko, Become an Escher sleuth, Mathematics Teaching in the Middle School 18 (No. 6, February 2013), 378–385.
  • Cooper, Linda, Tomayko, Min, & Roberge, Martin, Algebraic explorations using the city grid as coordinate axes, Utah Mathematics Teacher 5 (Fall/Winter 2012), 9–20.
  • Cooper, Linda, Tomayko, Ming & Spitzer, Sandy,  Escher unraveled: using artwork to investigate transformations, Bridges Proceedings (July, 2012).
  • Linda Cooper and Martin Roberge, Measuring Stream Discharge, Mathematics Teacher 105 (No. 9, May 2012), 658–664.
  • Linda Cooper and Ming Tomayko, Understanding place-value, Teaching Children Mathematics 17 (No. 9, May 2011), 558–567.
  • Linda Cooper, Eratosthenes meets the GPS: measuring the earth’s circumference, Ohio Journal of School Mathematics, (No. 62, Fall 2010), 11–16.
  • Linda Cooper and Felice Shore, Mapping the race to the White House: multiple representations of election results, Mathematics Teaching in the Middle School, (October 2010).
  • Linda Cooper and Felice Shore, The effects of data and graph type on concepts and visualizations of variability, Journal of Statistics Education 18 (No. 2, July 2010).
  • Linda Cooper and Martin Roberge, Enriching students' understanding of proportion: Google Earth and the concept of map scale, Mathematics Teaching in the Middle School, (April 2010).

Some of Dr. Cooper's presentations at conferences include:

  • "Put on Your Boots and Take Mathematics Outside," Maryland Conference of Teachers of Mathematics, Fulton, MD, October 2011.
  • "Exploring place-value concepts through ancient number systems", The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics Regional Meeting, Baltimore, MD, October 2010 [with Ming Tomayko].
  • “How do in-service teachers (grades 4-12) perceive variability?”, The Annual Joint Statistical Meetings, Washington, D.C., August 2009 [poster presentation with Felice Shore].
  •  “Building successful partnerships”, College Preparation Intervention Program Technical Assistance GEAR UP/CPIP Statewide Joint Meeting, Anne Arundel Community College, Arnold, MD, March 2009 [with Ameerah Bello].
  •  “Judging center and variability of data from different types of graphs”, Maryland Conference of Teachers of Mathematics, Eastern Technical School, Baltimore, MD, October 2008 [with Felice Shore].

Some of Dr. Cooper's workshops given include:

  • "Integrating Mathematics with Physical Geography, Diagnostic Medical Testing, and Technology," The Baltimore Excellence in STEM Teaching Project (BEST) Learning Community Meeting, Baltimore, MD, December 2011.
  •  “Integrate geography and technology in the mathematics classroom”, National Council of Teachers of Mathematics Annual Meeting, Washington, D.C., August 2009 [with Ming Tomayko and Martin Roberge].
  • “Misconceptions in interpreting center and variability in graphical representations: the complexities of visualizing summary measures”,  Annual Meeting of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, Salt Lake City, Utah, April 2008 [with Felice Shore].

Dr. Cooper received the following grants:

  • The Geomatics Academy at Wicomico High School, with Martin Roberge and Felice Shore, a CPIP (College Preparation Intervention Program) / GEAR UP (Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs) grant from the Maryland Higher Education Commission, July 2009–June 2010.
  • The Geomatics Academy at Fairmont Heights High School III, with Martin Roberge, Ming Tomayko, Felice Shore, Paporn Thebpanya, and Virginia Thompson, a CPIP (College Preparation Intervention Program) / GEAR UP (Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs) grant from the Maryland Higher Education Commission,
    July 2009–June 2010.
  • The Geomatics Academy at Fairmont Heights High School II, with Martin Roberge, Felice Shore, Paporn Thebpanya, and Virginia Thompson, a CPIP (College Preparation Intervention Program) / GEAR UP (Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs) grant from the Maryland Higher Education Commission, November 2008–October 2009.
  • The Geomatics Academy at Fairmont Heights High School, with Martin Roberge, Ming Tomayko, Paporn Thebpanya, and Jay Morgan, a CPIP (College Preparation Intervention Program) / GEAR UP (Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs) grant from the Maryland Higher Education Commission, April 2008–March 2009.


Dr. Gail Kaplan's current research interest is in the field of development and dissemination of innovative and active approaches to learning at every level.

Some of Dr. Kaplan's publications include:

  • Gail Kaplan, R. Michael Krach, and Sonali Raje, Connecting spatial reasoning ideas in mathematics and chemistry, The Mathematics Teacher 107 (No. 3, October 2013), 220–224.
  • Gail Kaplan, R. Michael Krach, and Sonali Raje, The Chinese number pyramid puzzel, The Mathematics Teacher 106 (No. 6, February 2013), 480.
  • Gail Kaplan, The book as a hook: literature and exponential functions, Ohio Journal of School Mathematics (No. 62, Fall 2010), 35–39.
  • Gail Kaplan and Anne Rice, Exploring exponential functions, Ohio Journal of School Mathematics (No. 62, Fall 2010), 40–43.
  • Gail Kaplan, Playing with hanging chains, exploring the catenary, Ohio Journal of School Mathematics (Fall 2009), 52–55.
  • Gail Kaplan, A mathematical excursion including art, architecture, history, Ohio Journal of School Mathematics (Fall 2009), 7–12.
  • Gail Kaplan, Flatland: a novel approach to mathematics, Ohio Journal of School Mathematics (Spring, 2008).
  • Gail Kaplan, Trigonometry through a ferris wheel, The Mathematics Teacher 102 (No, 2, September 2008).
  • Gail Kaplan, The catenary: art, architecture, history, and mathematics, Conference Proceedings of Bridges Leeuwarden, Holland: Mathematical Connections in Art, Music, and Science (Spring, 2008).

Some of Dr. Kaplan's presentations at conferences include:

  • “Mastering trigonometry by playing with ferris wheels, pasta, and more”, speaker at the Eastern Regional Conference of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM), Richmond, October 2007.

Dr. Kaplan has conducted workshops at International and National conferences.  Some of her workshops given include:

  • A workshop at the April 2005 Annual Meeting of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics which provided teachers with the opportunity to experience creative projects that expand the algebraic notion of function to unusual settings, including trigonometric graphs made from pasta, inverse trig rummy, and ferris wheel trigonometry.

Dr. Kaplan received the following grants:

  • A College Preparation Intervention for the Dundalk and Holabird Middle Schools, with R. Michael Krach and Todd Moyer, a GEAR UP (Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs) grant from the Maryland Higher Education Commission (2006 and renewed for 2007).


Dr. R. Michael Krach's current research interest is in the field of staff development activities in mathematics education.

Some of Dr. Krach's publications include:

  • R. Michael Krach, Gail Kaplan, and Sonali Raje, Connecting spatial reasoning ideas in mathematics and chemistry, The Mathematics Teacher 107 (No. 3, October 2013), 220–224.
  • R. Michael Krach, Gail Kaplan, and Sonali Raje, The Chinese number pyramid puzzel, The Mathematics Teacher 106 (No. 6, February 2013), 480..
  • R. Michael Krach, Estimating using whole numbers, Ohio Journal of School Mathematics (No. 64, Fall 2011), 43–45.
  • R. Michael Krach, The name game: an integer activity, Ohio Journal of School Mathematics (No. 62, Fall 2010), 44.
  • R. Michael Krach, The Meaning of the mean, Ohio Journal of School Mathematics (Fall 2009), 50–51.
  • R. Michael Krach, Honi Bamberger, Felice Shore, Judith Macks and Todd Moyer, An example of professional staff development in an urban setting, The Ohio Journal of School Mathematics (Spring 2009).
  • R. Michael Krach, Get Ready, Get Set, Tessellate, The Ohio Journal of School Mathematics (Autumn 2008), 49–51.

Some of Dr. Krach's presentations at conferences include:

  • “Problem solving workshops”, Maryland TESOL Annual Conference, 2006 and Maryland Council of Teachers of Mathematics (MCTM) Annual Conference, 2006.

Dr. Krach received the following grants:

  • A College Preparation Intervention for the Dundalk and Holabird Middle Schools, with Gail Kaplan and Todd Moyer, a GEAR UP (Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs) grant from the Maryland Higher Education Commission (2006 and renewed for 2007).
  • Building Capacity for Continuous Improvement Program for the Area 1 Title 1 K–8 Schools, with Honi Bamberger and Todd Moyer, from the Baltimore City Public School System (2005–2006).
  • The Maryland Governor's Academy for Science and Mathematics (MSDE), with Kate Denniston, from the State of Maryland.


Ms. Judith Macks' current research interests is in the field of mathematics education.

Some of Ms. Macks' publications include:

  • Judith Macks, The dog pen problem, Mathematics Teacher 107 (No. 1, August 2013), 80.
  • Judith Macks, Proof by example, Mathematics Teacher (May 2011).
  • Honi Bamberger, Felice Shore, Judith Macks, R. Michael Krach and Todd Moyer, An example of professional staff development in an urban setting, The Ohio Journal of School Mathematics (Spring 2009).

Some of Ms. Macks' presentations at conferences include:

  • "I’ve got It: using stuff you have to help students get the math", Maryland Council of Teachers of Mathematics Annual Conference, 2012.
  • “So big!! Big numbers for little people", Maryland Council of Teachers of Mathematics Annual Conference, 2011.
  • “Nifty number sense: games and activities to enhance number sense,” K-2 Conference of Math Science Innovation Center, Richmond VA, June 27, 2011.

Ms. Macks received the following grant:

  • STEM Security Initiative Grant for work in Baltimore City Public Schools, with Honi Bamberger and Maureen Yarnevich, from Maryland Higher Education Commission (MHEC), (2011-2012).


Dr. Todd Moyer's current research interests are in the fields of teacher education and incorporating technology into the curriculum.

Some of Dr. Moyer's publications include:

  • Todd Moyer, Trigonometric functions through right triangle similarities, Ohio Journal of School Mathematics (Fall 2013), 33–42.
  • Todd Moyer, Keeping all the trains on the tracks, NCTM’s Mathematics Teaching in the Middle School 16 (No. 2, September 2010), 116–120.
  • Honi Bamberger, Felice Shore, Judith Macks, R. Michael Krach and Todd Moyer, An example of professional staff development in an urban setting, Ohio Journal of School Mathematics (Spring 2009).
  • Todd Moyer and Edward Gambler, A Fathom Activity for the Central Limit Theorem, NCTM Mathematics Teacher 102 (No. 2, September 2008), 151–153.

Some of Dr. Moyer's presentations at conferences include:

  • “Teaching AP Calculus or Calculus I with the Geometer's Sketchpad”, Maryland Council of Teachers of Mathematics Annual Conference, Millersville, MD, October 2006.

Dr. Moyer received the following grants:

  • A College Preparation Intervention for the Dundalk and Holabird Middle Schools, with Gail Kaplan and R. Michael Krach, a GEAR UP (Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs) grant from the Maryland Higher Education Commission (2006 and renewed for 2007).
  • Building Capacity for Continuous Improvement Program for the Area 1 Title 1 K–8 Schools, with Honi Bamberger and R. Michael Krach, from the Baltimore City Public School System (2005–2006).


Dr. Reza Sarhangi's current research interests are in the fields of  mathematics education, control theory and mathematical connections in art, music and science.

Some of Dr. Sarhangi's publications include:

  • Reza Sarhangi and Mary Kay Kirchner, Connecting the art of Navajo weaving to secondary education, Ohio Journal of School Mathematics (No. 64, Fall 2011), 11–17.
  • Reza Sarhangi, Fractal geometry designs on a dynamic geometry utility and their significance, Ohio Journal of School Mathematics (Fall 2009), 35–42.
  • Reza Sarhangi and Slavik Jablan, Elementary Constructions of Persian Mosaics, Math Horizons 14 (No. 1, September 2006), 10–13.
  • Elements of Geometry for Teachers, Pearson, Addison & Wesley Publication (2003).


Dr. Lawrence Shirley's current research interests are in the fields of ethnomathematics, mathematics teacher education and curriculum implementation, history of mathematics.

Some of Dr. Shirley's publications include:

  • Lawrence Shirley and Iorhemen J. Kyeleve, “A Cyclic Pattern of Mathematics Curriculum Trends”, Dhindsa, Harkirat et al (editors), “Future Directions in Science, Mathematics and Technical Education”, Universiti Brunei Darussalam, 2005.
  • Lawrence Shirley, Sarah Greenwald and Amy Ksir, Thomas Fuller and his calculation ability, The Centroid (Journal of the North Carolina Council of Teachers of Mathematics) 30 (No. 1, Spring 2004), 15–19.
  • Lawrence Shirley, Ethnomathematics as a fundamental of instructional methodology, Zentralblatt fur Didaktik der Mathematik--International Reviews on Mathematical Education Issue 2001/3 (June 2001).

Dr. Shirley also has presented papers at many conferences and meetings of which only a few are listed below:

  • Numbers in culture, culture in numbers: my favorite numbers”, National Council of Teachers of Mathematics Annual Meeting, St Louis MO, (April 2006).
  • “Ethnomathematics in global education programs”, Third International Congress of Ethnomathematics (ICEM-3), Auckland, New Zealand, (February 2006).
  • “Ethnomathematics: math in a cultural context”, International Studies Schools Association, Littleton CO,(February 2005).
  • “Believing in impossible mathematics: historical examples”, Eastern Regional Conference of the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM), Maryland, (October 2004).


Dr. Felice Shore's current research interest is in the field of mathematics education, and specifically continuing professional development for in-service teachers.

Some of Dr. Shore's publications include:

  • Felice Shore, Sandy Spitzer and Christine Phelps, Using Classroom Evidence to Inform and Improve Teaching, Annual Perspectives in Mathematics Education 2014: Using Research to Improve Instruction bfrom NCTM (2014).
  • Felice Shore and Linda Cooper, Mapping the race to the White House: multiple representations of election results, Mathematics Teaching in the Middle School, (October 2010).
  • Felice Shore and Linda Cooper, The effects of data and graph type on concepts and visualizations of variability, Journal of Statistics Education 18 (No. 2, July 2010).
  • Honi Bamberger, Felice Shore, Judith Macks, R. Michael Krach and Todd Moyer, An example of professional staff development in an urban setting, The Ohio Journal of School Mathematics (Spring 2009).
  • Felice Shore and Matt Pascal, The dreaded 'work' problems revisited: connections through problem solving from basic fractions to calculus, Mathematics Teacher 101 (No. 7, March 2008), 504–511.

Dr. Shore has received the following grants:

  • A 2010 grant from the Middle Grades Partnership Fund of the Baltimore Community Foundation to provide summer and school year enrichment for Baltimore City School children.
  • A 2009 grant from the Middle Grades Partnership Fund of the Baltimore Community Foundation to provide summer and school year enrichment for Baltimore City School children.


Dr. Martha J. Siegel's current research interests are in the fields of applied probability, mathematical models and college mathematics curriculum reform .

Some of Dr. Siegel's publications include:

  • Martha J. Siegel, An article in War Stories from Applied Mathematics: Undergraduate Consultancy Projects, Robert Fraga, Editor, The Mathematical Association of America, MAA Notes #71, 67–80.
  • Martha J. Siegel, Several articles in Leading the Mathematical Sciences Department: A Resource for Chairs, Tina H. Straley, Marcia P. Sward, and Jon W. Scott, Editors, The Mathematical Association of America, 2005.
  • Larry J. Goldstein, David I. Schneider, and Martha J. Siegel, Finite Mathematics and Its Applications, 8th ed., Prentice Hall, 2004.
  • Sheldon P. Gordon, Florence S. Gordon, Alan C. Tucker, and Martha J. Siegel, Functioning in the Real World: A Precalculus Experience, 2nd ed., Addison Wesley, 2004.

Dr. Siegel has received the following grants:

  • NSF S-STEM Program grant, with Joyce C. Little and Gail Gasparich, COSMIC* Scholars, 2007-2011
  • National Science Foundation (NSF)/National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) grant to attend International Congress on Mathematics Education -11 in Monterrey, Mexico, July 2007.
  • National Science Foundation (NSF)/National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) grant to attend International Congress on Mathematics Education -10 in Copenhagen, Denmark, July 2004.
  • NSF CSEMS Program grant, with Joyce C. Little, COSMIC Scholars, 2002-2006.


Dr. Sandy Spitzer's current research interests are in the fields of pre-service teacher education, technology use in mathematics education, algebra learning and teaching.

Some of Dr. Spitzer's publications include:

  • Sandy Spitzer, Felice Shore and Christine Phelps, Using Classroom Evidence to Inform and Improve Teaching, Annual Perspectives in Mathematics Education 2014: Using Research to Improve Instruction bfrom NCTM (2014).
  • Sandy Spitzer, Linda Cooper and Ming Tomayko, Become an Escher sleuth, Mathematics Teaching in the Middle School (to appear).
  • Sandy Spitzer and Christine Phelps, Systematically improving lessons in teacher education: What's good for prospective teachers is good for teacher educators, The Teacher Educator (to appear).
  • Sandy Spitzer, Christine Phelps, J. Beyers, D. Johnson and E. Sieminski, Developing prospective elementary teachers' abilities to identify evidence of student mathematical achievement, Journal of Mathematics Teacher Education 14 (No. 1, 2011), 67.
  • Sandy Spitzer, Anne Morris and James Hiebert, Mathematical knowledge for teaching in planning and evaluating instruction: what can pre-service teachers learn?, Journal for Research in Mathematics Education 40 (No. 5, 2009), 491–529.
  • Sandy Spitzer and Amanda Jansen, Prospective middle school mathematics teachers' reflective thinking skills: descriptions of their students' thinking and interpretations of their teaching, Journal for Mathematics Teacher Education 12 (No. 2, 2009), 133–151.

Some of Dr. Spitzer's presentations at conferences include:

  • “Helping prospective teachers pay attention to student thinking: The effects of an online discussion board", 33rd Annual Meeting of the North American Chapter of the International Group for the Psychology of Mathematics Education, Reno, Nevada, October 2011 [poster presentation].
  • “Collaboratively learning to learn from teaching: The effects of an online discussion board", Annual Conference of the Association of Mathematics Teacher Educators, Irvine, California, (January 2011) [poster presentation].
  • "Improving prospective elementary teachers’ abilities to evaluate evidence of student mathematical achievement", Annual Conference of the Association of Mathematics Teacher Educators, Irvine, California, (January 2010).


Dr. Wei Sun's current research interest is in the field of curriculum development in mathematics education.

Some of Dr. Sun's publications include:

  • Wei Sun, Making sense of fraction: lessons of Chinese curriculum, Journal of the Korea Society of Mathematical Education (September 2006).
  • Wei Sun, Teaching percent through problem solving in Chinese classrooms, The Ohio Journal of School Mathematics (Autumn 2004).

Some of Dr. Sun's presentations at National and International conferences include:

  • Mathematics preparation for students in teacher education programs in China, 9th International Congress on Mathematics Education, Tokyo, August 2000.


Dr. Ming Tomayko's current research interests are in the fields of mathematics education, teacher induction and professional development.

Some of Dr. Tomayko's publications include:

  • Ming Tomayko, Linda Cooper and Sandy Spitzer, Become an Escher sleuth, Mathematics Teaching in the Middle School (to appear).
  • Ming Tomayko and Linda Cooper, Understanding place-value, Teaching Children Mathematics 17 (No. 9, May 2011), 558–567.
  • Ming Tomayko, Working conditions of Maryland mathematics teachers, Banneker Banner (Fall/Winter 2008).

Some of Dr. Tomayko's presentations at conferences include:

  • "Exploring place-value concepts through ancient number systems", The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics Regional Meeting, Baltimore, MD, October 2010 [with Linda Cooper].


Dr. Maureen Yarnevich's current research interest is in the field of incorporating mathematical connections into K-16 curriculum.

Some of Dr. Yarnevich's publications include:

  • M. Yarnevich, B. McShea and J. Vogel, Harry Potter and the magic of mathematics, NCTM, Mathematics Teaching in the Middle School (April 2005).
  • M. Yarnevich and B. McShea, “How the number of credits of college mathematics affects mean salary and occupation choice. A comparison by gender”, Changing the Faces of Mathematics: Perspectives on Gender, The National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, Fall 2001.

Dr. Yarnevich has received the following grant:

  • Experiencing Geometry: Enhancing Prospective Elementary and Middle School Teacher, with Dr. Tad Watanabe, a CCLI Grant from the National Science Foundation.

Department of Mathematics
7800 York Road, Room 316 (campus map)
Hours: Monday - Friday, 8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Phone: 410-704-3091
Fax: 410-704-4149
E-mail: math@towson.edu


 

 

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