January Conference 2014

 

Tentative Program

 

Please view the concurrent sessions below.

Session Descriptions

Concurrent Session I: 10:05 – 10:50 am (45 minutes Presentations)

 

Title and Presenter
Presentation Description

TBA

Chesapeake I

Presenter:

Dr. L. Lee Knefelkamp, Keynote Speaker

TBA

Is “Writing for Teachers” Equipping Students to Write in the Workplace?
Chesapeake II

Presenter:
Dr. Harvey Lillywhite,
English

This presentation describes writing assignments that target a real-world reader and an “issue” the real reader would find important. It shows how critical thinking involves generating useful content about a topic by discovering real questions the reader has about the topic. It demonstrates “question factoring,” brainstorming questions to develop a topic for a reader. It demonstrates evaluating assignments for message soundness and a sound presentation. To help writers generate useful content for a real user of that information, organize and format it so that it’s easy for the reader to navigate, and express the content clearly and concisely, it demonstrates the HOCs and LOCs paradigm (HOCs=Higher Order Concerns; LOCs = Lower Order Concerns) to help isolate these necessary and complementary writing skills.

TBA

Chesapeake II

TBA

The Music Video Assignment: Supporting the Digital Learner in a Diverse Learning Environment
UU 306

Presenter:
Ms. Margaret J. Mc Cormick,
Nursing

 

Music is a universal language that can transcend across diverse learning styles and environments. The music video assignment provides a multi-sensory and whole brain approach to understanding pharmacological interventions for neurodegenerative diseases. This assignment shows a logical relationship to the objectives and intended outcome of the course, illustrating both theory and assumptions underlying the assignment. The purpose of this project was to help broaden a student’s familiarity with commonly used medications for Parkinson’s disease as well as increase skill with creative uses of technology. A rubric was used to evaluate the accuracy of content and creativity of the multimedia presentation. This active learning experience enhanced student interaction and helped them to develop a better sense of community and cooperation with their classmates.

 

Concurrent Session II: 11:00 – 11:45 am (45 minutes Presentations)

 

Title and Presenter

Presentation Description

Learn how to PAL: Peer Assisted Learning for the Didactic Setting
Chesapeake I

Presenter:
Dr. Emily Hildebrand,
Kinesiology

The presentation will provide attendees with insight on the interconnectedness and execution of the Peer Assisted Learning model, Reciprocal teaching style, and feedback as instructional strategies for didactic courses.

To balance content driven curricula within healthcare professions, the strategies may be implemented to maximize academic learning time, challenge peers to guide each other toward becoming proficient clinicians, promote all learning domains, and gain instant feedback. Many professional preparation majors include lecture and laboratory experiences structured to promote transfer of knowledge to practical situations while maintaining accreditation compliance. The use of the aforementioned strategies were implemented to produce beneficial classroom experiences for the learner and may be modified to fit the needs of any instructor and course content. Through examination, comparison, and evaluation of the Peer Assisted Learning model, Reciprocal teaching style, and feedback, educators may find the integration of the instructional strategies valuable for didactic course settings.

Supportive, Strategic Facilitation: Leading Whole-Class Discussion
Chesapeake II

Presenter:
Dr. Lisa M. Barker,
Secondary and Middle School Education


Facilitating classroom discussion is hard work and requires faculty to both carefully prepare and improvise based on students’ contributions. How do we learn to engage in the difficult work of orchestrating a rich and, by nature, improvised discussion? Attendees can expect to participate in an interactive presentation of strategies for helping our students prepare for, participate in, and reflect upon purposeful classroom discussions. We will examine tools for how to plan for discussions (i.e., setting norms, selecting material, designing questions), facilitate classroom talk (i.e., listening actively, monitoring participation, responding to ideas), and assess and provide feedback on the quality of discussion. Participants will leave the workshop with tangible tools and strategies they can try out during the spring semester.

Digital Docent: Using Augmented Reality for Active Learning
Chesapeake III

Presenter:
Mr. James Louis Cosper,
Art + Design, Art History, Art Education


Augmented Reality (AR) is an emerging technology instructors may use to extend classroom learning to remote site-based active learning experiences.

AR enables instructors to create asynchronous locative experiences grounded on their personal research and perspectives as creators of knowledge. The AR application functions as a lens of instructor-curated content presenting a location or object in a new manner. With common tools like smartphones and tablets, AR applications may be used to enhance cognition or perception with annotations not in the physical environment.

Disciplines that benefit from visual learning or site visits in particular could benefit from AR. This technology has broad applicability to a variety of disciplines because of the shared goal of engaging students in the creation of knowledge. I will present two case study examples of using AR for Graphic Design education and the steps needed to make an AR experience using commonly available programs and tools.

Faculty Teaching Circles

 

Expert faculty members will be available to discuss how they are engaging students to connect with theory, course content, and research through diverse instructional practices, technologies, and collaborations.

Presenters:

Dr. Jessica Shiller
Instructional Leadership and Professional Development

Ms. Joyce Garczynski
Library

Mr. Robert Eyer
Computer and Information Sciences

Ms. Sarah Espinosa
Library

Ms. Claire Holmes
Library

Using Video as a Research Tool

Dr. Jessica Shiller will share how she video to help students conduct research. Her students collaborated with a local community organization that uses video to explore problems facing urban youth. She will walk attendees through the various steps involved in this assignment and the process of collaboration with an outside organization.

Reinventing the Research Paper

Imagine your students publishing their research on current issues in an easy-to-grade digital format with audiences beyond the Towson campus! Cook Library regularly creates infoPlaylists – compilations of annotated web resources and images on topics with contemporary urgency – on the library blog. The library has recently begun to partner with classroom faculty to develop opportunities for students to write their own playlists and simultaneously profile their writing and research skills in an open digital environment. Ms. Joyce Garczynski will introduce the infoPlaylist format and a variety of research-related assignments involving infoPlaylists.

Creating an Actively Engaged Classroom with Apps

Mr. Robert Eyer will demonstrate two stand-alone Java applications he developed to engage students in class. When used during the last part of a lecture period, instructors could use this tool to gauge student attention and to detect content areas that may have been difficult to understand. Both of the proposed methods can be integrated into most coursework without modification of the course content.

Staying the Course: Using a Curriculum Map to Locate Intersections Among Disciplinary and Core Courses, Library Instruction, and Student Learning Outcomes

Ms. Sarah Espinosa and Ms. Claire Holmes will discuss Cook Library’s Curriculum Mapping Project which links information literacy theory and instructional practice. This project includes an analysis of the correlation between courses that currently integrate information literacy instruction, University Core courses, and courses that that align with program outcomes which meet accreditation requirements. The project provides a foundation for collaboration among librarians, faculty and program directors to examine programs of study and identify opportunities to scaffold instruction and the assessment of information literacy learning, so that we can ensure that our students leave Towson University having gained incremental and cumulative information literacy competence and confidence.

 

Concurrent Session III: 1:15 – 2:00 pm (45 minutes Presentations)

 

Title and Presenter
Presentation Description

I-Search Research: An Alternative to the Traditional Research Assignment
Chesapeake I

Presenter:
Ms. Catherine Hearn,
English

An I-Search research assignment is an alternative to the traditional research assignment. Instead of beginning with a thesis, the I-Search research paper begins with a question or a topic. Students begin writing as they do their research, researching and writing their way to a thesis.

As the student reads and researches, she recounts and reflects on her research. She analyzes what she has learned from her research and comes to a thesis. This assignment can be used across the curriculum and adapted to include revision assignments, presentations, and other extended learning assignments.

Attendees will learn what an I-Search research assignment is and how they can use it in their teaching, helping students to research, think, and write more critically.

Considering the Video Essay: An Experiment in Transitioning Scholarship from Traditional Text to Audio-Visual Media
Chesapeake II

Presenter,
Mr. Joseph A Kraemer,
Electronic Media and Film

This presentation explores the pedagogical implications of replacing the text-based traditional essay with the video essay as an assessment tool in order to synthesize scholarship with new media technologies and audio-visual content that are the modern student’s preferred methods of communication and self-expression. The video essay is an emerging medium that seeks to bridge “old” methods of academic research and scholarship with new communication techniques and distribution models offered by the internet, social networks and mobile devices. The purpose of this new form of scholarship is to foster greater media literacy and awareness within students by pushing them to utilize the tools they carry with them everywhere, the “always on, always on us” devices like laptops, smart phones and tablets, which come with the recording and editing capabilities needed for to accomplish this goal.

TBA

Chesapeake III

TBA

Scholarship is a Conversation and Other Things Your Students Don’t Know: Getting Students to Think Critically Through the Research Process
UU 306

Presenters:
Ms. Sara Arnold-Garza,
Library

Ms. Carissa Tomlinson,
Library

This session translates big picture ideas about research into practical learning experiences. With an introduction to the core concepts of information literacy, attendees will get suggestions for activities that encourage critical thinking in the research process. Academic librarians teach with guidance from the Association of College and Research Libraries’ standards. This Framework for Information Literacy for Higher Education connects conceptual frames to practices and dispositions that can be encouraged and observed in student work. This session will focus on just 2 frames: Scholarship is a Conversation and Research as Inquiry, which are applicable to research across disciplines, but come easily only to those inducted into the research mindset. By collaborating with librarians, you can teach students the big ideas about research that make it meaningful and engaging!

 

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The January Conference will take place on January 14, 2015 in the Chesapeake Rooms of the University Union.


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