Course Descriptions

EDUC 557 Hebrew Language Instruction for Educators
Hebrew is fundamental to any Jewish learning experience.  This course will explore Hebrew from the vantage point of common language patterns, both written and spoken, that should be routinely incorporated into Jewish teaching.  Students will address issues of language acquisition and develop skills for teaching Hebrew as a second language.  Prerequisites:  None

EDUC 600 Foundation of Jewish Education (3)
This course explores the historical and theoretical foundations of Jewish education. Issues include: How did the Jewish day school, Hebrew school, and summer camp begin in the United States? What major problems do Jewish educators face and how have experts addressed these problems? Prerequisites: None.

EDUC 604 Curriculum Planning and Decision Making for the Jewish School (3)
This core course will provide the theoretical and practical sources for the design implementation of curricula in congregational, communal, or day school settings.  Drawing from Jewish and general education sources, the course will examine primary dimensions of curriculum planning and decision making.  Prerequisites: None

EDUC 606 From Vision to Practice in Jewish Education (3)
This course explores the significance of school vision by learning different Jewish educational visions from multiple perspectives. Acting as social scientists, students will compare the espoused philosophy of schools to their practices in "real time" in order to develop an agenda for school change.  Prerequisites:  None

EDUC 613 Moral Questions in the Classroom (3)
Develop an understanding of competing models of moral education models that include: a virtues approach, cognitive developmentalism, and care ethics. Consider practical ways to teach texts in a variety of subjects to foster moral development as well as consider school-wide applications of moral education such as character education, discipline, and addressing bullying.

EDUC 620 Models and Methods of Teaching Customs and Practice
This course will provide a framework to understand Jewish religious practices. Students will learn a selection of laws, customs and rituals, and will be provided with creative strategies, techniques and activities relevant to both informal and formal Jewish education settings.

EDUC 621 Models and Methods of Teaching Jewish Holidays (3)
This course will focus on the processes of teaching and learning Jewish holidays. The course combines effective pedagogy with content knowledge of Jewish holiday. Hands-on approach and innovative techniques to teaching holidays will be examined.

EDUC 647 Teaching Classical Jewish Text (3) 
This course focuses on different approaches to teaching Bible including the psychological, literary, and historical. Emphasizing a teaching approach of conduction good interpretive discussions, student will learn how to better engage learner of all ages.  Prerequisites:  None

EDUC 655 Exploration of the History, Politics and Culture of Israel (3)
Given Israel’s rapidly changing society, U.S. students have questions about the Jewish State. Students will learn more information about Israel’s history, politics and cultural diversity, as well as methodologies to effectively communicate the complexities of these subjects to their own students.

EDUC 764 Qualitative Research in Jewish Education (3)
How can research help to understand and solve problems in Jewish schools today.  By studying prior research in Jewish and general education, students will learn how to designs a research proposal for their own educational settings.  Prerequisites:  None

FMST 550 Fundamentals of Leadership in the Nonprofit Sector
Overview of non-profit organizations, roles and responsibilities of leaders in the non-profit sector, issues concerning nonprofits. Junior/Senior standing required. Prerequisites: PSYC 101, SOCI 101, ENGL 102, FMST 101, FMST 201, and consent of Chair.

FMST 555 Fundraising, Friendraising and Volunteer Management
How nonprofit organizations generate and manage financial and human resources, including the theoretical, behavioral and pragmatic foundations of philanthropy, fund development, and volunteerism. Prerequisites: FMST 350/550 & MKTG 341.

FMST 370/570 Study Abroad: Exploring Cross-Cultural Educational and Social Services in Baltimore and Israel (3)
This course will be an experiential opportunity for students to travel to Israel to explore culture and service and to compare that nation’s techniques with Baltimore institutions. Students will learn how Israel has developed schools and social services at national and local levels—from setting policies to putting practices to work in urban areas such as Jerusalem and Tel Aviv; in small communities such as Yerucham, a development city in the Negev; and in Baltimore’s sister city, Ashkelon. Participants will have opportunities to explore the Israeli institutions that deal with an ongoing influx of immigrants with widely varying cultures, languages and educational backgrounds, as well as needs for housing, transportation, health care and social integration.

FMST 620 Project in Family Community Program Development (3)
Exploration of complex relationships in family program development, and student involvement in a family focused service learning project.  Students will conduct initial field exploration to identify a focus area that could benefit from creative family programming.  Potential service areas are school communities, social service agencies, and non-profit programs.  The project will require a comprehensive needs assessment to identify problems and a program plan designed to offer intervention.
Prerequisites: Graduate standing and consent of Program Director

ILPD 650 Exploration of Holocaust Education
Critical exploration of various topics of the Holocaust through art, literature, life stories, and film. Core information about the history of the Holocaust and the context and implications of that history. Examine effective teaching methodologies and challenge each student to prepare and present curricular units utilizing different teaching models.

JCS 600 Leadership in Jewish Education and Communal Service
Discusses theoretical concepts, practical insights and their application to leadership within Jewish communal institutions. Focuses on inspiring and developing effective leadership by addressing topics such as building a vision, encouraging collaboration, overcoming obstacles, recognizing community values and institutional opportunities, and improving communication. Students create a personal growth plan to apply to their career path in order to understand and improve their leadership performance. Prerequisite: graduate standing.

JCS 610 Principles of Jewish Communal Services(3)
A comprehensive overview of the American Jewish community today, and a survey of specific challenges facing professionals in the field of Jewish Communal Service. Topics include major themes of American Jewish history; an introduction to the organization of the American Jewish community in the 21st century, including current day communal structures and institutional functions; an in-depth look at the most pressing issues confronting the American Jewish community today, as well as some of the newest solutions that have been raised by lay and professional leaders;and practical training in leadership skills.

JCS 611 Management of Human Services: Leadership and Supervision (3)
Introduces broad foundations and current theories of leadership and challenges participants to consider how to implement successful leadership in 21st-century community organizations. This course guides students in considering how to apply leadership in real life personal and institutional settings. Practical training in leadership development.

JCS 612 Strategic Management of Jewish Organizations: Material Resources  (3)
Unique internal dynamics and external relationships of non-profit organizations and especially Jewish non-profits.  Material resource issues such as; fiscal management, policy formation, strategic planning, marketing and fund-raising, advocacy, philanthropy and priority planning. Prerequisites:  None

JCS 614 Jewish Communal Service Practicum Seminar (year-long, 1 unit) *
The monthly practicum seminar provides an opportunity for Master of Arts in Jewish Communal Service students to study with their peers and professional leaders.  Theoretical and practical aspects of contemporary issues are discussed as well as relations with lay leaders; and community visionaries.  This seminar integrates the studies and professional development to enable students to be confident as they embark on their careers.  Register for the course in the second term.  Participation in the seminar is mandatory for a minimum of two years.  Prerequisites:  None

JCS 618 Internship in Jewish Communal Service*
Students enrolled in the MAJCS program are required to complete a supervised field internship.  This internship is carefully designed to develop leadership skills necessary to become a Jewish Communal Professional. The internship will enable students to develop the skills necessary for professional growth and adhere to the individual goals.  Students must complete a minimum of two full days per week in a Jewish institution or organization. Special permit is required. Prerequisites:  Consult with program director prior to registration.

JDST 544 Biblical Hebrew I
Introduction to Hebrew with emphasis on the grammar, vocabulary, syntax, and style of Biblical Hebrew.  The fundamentals of Hebrew language; preparation to read and translate classical Hebrew texts. Foundation for continued studies of the classical Hebrew of the Hebrew Bible and rabbinic texts as well as the Hebrew of the contemporary idiom.  Prerequisites:  None

JDST 545 Biblical Hebrew II
Introduction to the fundamentals of Hebrew language; foundation for continued studies of the classical Hebrew contain in the Hebrew Bible and rabbinic texts as well as the Hebrew of the contemporary idion.  Prerequisites: JDST 544 Biblical Hebrew I or consent of instructor.

JDST 546 Biblical Hebrew III
Continued study of Biblical Hebrew tests with concentration on more complicated structures of Hebrew grammar, morphology, syntax, and vocabulary. Prerequisites: Six units of Biblical Hebrew or consent of instructor.

JDST 547 Biblical Hebrew IV
Reinforcement and expansion of existing knowledge of Biblical Hebvrew; use of classical Hebrew texts to review Biblical Hebrew grammar and to build vocabulary; introduction of literary features in Biblical Hebrew narrative. Prerequisites: JDST 546 or consent of instructor.

JDST 585 Jewish Law and Ethics
Cutting edge issues of ethical and legal concern as understood by traditional Jewish legal and ethical sources and by contemporary Jewish thinkers.  Basic structure and methodology of Jewish law. Understanding of the system through examination of different issues.  Prerequisites: None

JDST 600 Biblical Literature and Civilization
The Bible as the primary vehicle for the understanding of Israelite civilization.  Critical examination of the Bible and its literature.  Insights on literary form, style and function in ancient Israel; Israel's culture and history during the first millennium BCE; and Israel's religious ideas, institutions and theology.  Prerequisites: None

JDST 610 Diaspora Jewish Communities
Survey of Jewish world following World War II, examining Jewish communities in Israel, North America, Western, Central and Eastern Europe, South America, South Africa and Australia. Jewish life in each region, diverse challenges to maintaining  Jewish distinctiveness; Diaspora Jewish communities' changing relationship to Israel and Zionism; shifting role of Israeli Jewry and American Jewry on the world stage in the late 20th and early 21st centuries.  Prerequisites: None.

JDST 611 American Judaism
Comprehensive introduction to the 350-year history of the American Jewish community. The colonial and revolutionary periods: Jewish immigration to the U.S. from Central Europe (1840-1880) and Eastern Europe (1881-1924); life in the United Stated during the first half of the 20th century, including the impact of World War I, the depression, the Holocaust and the founding of Israel on American Jewish life; post-World War II developments including the crisis in Jewish liberalism, and complicated relations between Blacks and Jews; ethnic revival following the Six-Day War in 1067; debates over affirmative action; contemporary Jewish issues. Prerequisites: None

JDST 630 The Jews in the Middle Ages
Jewish history from the seventh century through the expulsion of the Jews from Spain in 1492.

JDST 631 The Jews in the Modern World
Major transformations in Jewish history from the enlightenment through the conclusion of the twentieth century.  Topics include: Jewish emancipation in Europe, religious transformations, the rise of modern anti-Semitism, East European Jewry and the emergence of Jewish politics and secular Jewish ideologies, the Zionist movement, the Holocaust, the founding and impact of the state of Israel, and the emergence of a vibrant American Jewish community.  Prerequisites: None

JDST 663 Contemporary Jewish Ethics: Reshaping the Jewish Identity in Our Generation
Innovative trends of Jewish ethics and spirituality in the new modern Jewish world. Contemporary ideologies of both secular and religious Judaism since the rise of Haskalah and Zionism. Reflections on the Jewish community in America, and on the Jewish people in Israel. Influential authors including Rosenzweig, Buber, Heschel, Kaplan, Soloveitchik, Agnon, Scholem, and Leibowitz. Jewish authenticity and individuality; existential freedom and ethical responsibility; assimilation and secularism; contemporary spirituality and creativity. Prerequisites: None.

JDST 666 Introduction to Jewish Thought and Mysticism
Examination of the religious ideas and the historical developments of Jewish thought over the last two thousand years.  Prerequisites:  None.

JDST 671 The History and Dynamics of the Arab-Israeli Conflict

JDST 680 Rabbinic History and Literature
Exploration of the history, literature and major personalities of the period from the return of the Jews from the Babylonian exile (516 BCE) until the Arab conquest of Palestine (c. 634 CE).  Prerequisites: None.

JDST 544 Biblical Hebrew I
Introduction to Hebrew with emphasis on the grammar, vocabulary, syntax, and style of Biblical Hebrew. The fundamentals of Hebrew language; preparation to read and translate classical Hebrew texts. Foundation for continued studies of the classical Hebrew of the Hebrew Bible and rabbinic texts as well as the Hebrew of the contemporary idiom. Prerequisites: None

JDST 545 Biblical Hebrew II
Introduction to the fundamentals of Hebrew language; foundation for continued studies of the classical Hebrew contain in the Hebrew Bible and rabbinic texts as well as the Hebrew of the contemporary idion. Prerequisites: JDST 544 Biblical Hebrew I or consent of instructor.

JDST 546 Biblical Hebrew III
Continued study of Biblical Hebrew tests with concentration on more complicated structures of Hebrew grammar, morphology, syntax, and vocabulary. Prerequisites: Six units of Biblical Hebrew or consent of instructor.

JDST 547 Biblical Hebrew IV
Reinforcement and expansion of existing knowledge of Biblical Hebvrew; use of classical Hebrew texts to review Biblical Hebrew grammar and to build vocabulary; introduction of literary features in Biblical Hebrew narrative. Prerequisites: JDST 546 or consent of instructor.

HEBR 101 Modern Hebrew I
An introduction to Hebrew.  Speaking, reading, and writing, the development of conversational ability, free composition, and translation from English to Hebrew. GenEd II.D. or Core: Arts & Humanities.

HEBR 102 Modern Hebrew II
An introduction to Hebrew.  Speaking, reading, and writing, the development of conversational ability, free composition, and translation from English to Hebrew. Prerequisite: HEBR 101. GenEd II.D or Core: Global Perspectives.

HEBR 201 Modern Hebrew III
A continued review of grammatical structure with emphasis on conversational and reading fluency.  Vocabulary building, composition and reading and discussion of selected outside readings. Prerequisites: HEBR 102. GenEd II.D. or Core: Arts & Humanities.

HEBR 202 Modern Hebrew IV
A continued review of grammatical structure with emphasis on conversational and reading fluency.  Vocabulary building, composition and reading and discussion of selected outside readings. Prerequisites: HEBR 201. GenEd II.D or Core: Global Perspectives.