Tigers Report

Towson University encourages you to report if you or someone you know has experienced sexual harassment, sexual assault, relationship violence, stalking, sexual exploitation, or sexual intimidation. Learn the options for reporting sexual violence. 

Reporting Options

The university will respond to all reports and provide you with support, resources, and information on your options moving forward. We take your privacy very seriously, and we work hard to protect it by excluding identifying information about you from publicly available records to the extent permissible by law.

Learn more about the Towson investigation process at Tigers Respond. In most cases, the option to move forward with a formal university investigation will be in your hands.

As a student, you have federally protected rights. Learn more about your Title IX rights

Frequently asked questions

What is the difference between reporting to the Office of Inclusion & Institutional Equity and the police? 

The Office of Inclusion & Institutional Equity defines sexual violence in the Towson Sexual Misconduct Policy. Any sexual activity that takes place without consent is a violation of this policy. The university uses a preponderance of evidence (more likely than not) standard to determine if a violation of the Sexual Misconduct Policy occurred.

When called to respond to sexual violence, the Towson University Police will call the Baltimore County Police Department. Baltimore County Police define sexual violence crimes by Maryland law. Maryland law has different definitions of sexual violence than Towson University. Criminal cases in a court of law also use a beyond a reasonable doubt standard to determine if a law was broken.

You can learn more about the differences between the reporting to the university and/or the police at the Office of Inclusion & Institutional Equity and/or through a TurnAround legal advocate. 

How much time do I have to make a report?

There is no time limit on making a report of sexual violence to the university. Towson will be there to respond and provide support whenever you decided to reach out. 

If you report to the police the legal statute of limitations depends on what sexual violence occurred and the legal jurisdiction of the incident. 

You can learn more about the difference between the reporting to the university and/or the police at the Office of Inclusion & Institutional Equity and/or through a TurnAround legal advocate. 

If I report, what happens next? 

If you report to the university, you will be contacted by someone from the Office of Inclusion & Institutional Equity/Title IX Coordinator. This is typically done via your Towson University email account. It will invite you to meet in person to discuss your options for interim measures/accommodations and investigation in more detail. It will also include information about confidential and private resources, both on and off campus. You have the option to meet with a staff member from the Office of Inclusion & Institutional Equity. If you do not need support or do not wish to have the University investigate the incident, you do not need to respond.

If you call Towson University Police they will make a police report with your name, which becomes public record. The Towson Police will call the police department with jurisdiction over the area the incident occurred. The police will respond by determining if the incident meets a legal criteria to be investigated. If it does meet this criteria, police will conduct a formal criminal investigation. This investigation informs their decision to peruse a criminal case. 

You can learn more about the difference between  university and police investigations at the Office of Inclusion & Institutional Equity and/or through a TurnAround legal advocate. 

If I report, will there automatically be an investigation?

Not necessarily. Individuals often report to the university and seek services, but do not wish to proceed with a formal investigation for various reasons. Most often this request is honored. The university will look into the information provided to assess the threat and danger to the campus community when deciding to move forward with an investigation. You will be notified and invited to participate in the investigation, but are not required to do so.

If you report to the police, they will decide if the incident will be investigated or not. In some cases the police will determine that the evidence and/or facts of the case are not enough to go forward according to Maryland law. A police term for this is ‘unfounded.’ This does not necessarily mean that you were not believed. It does not mean that what happened to you was okay. It may simply mean that the case might not meet the criteria for prosecution. If, however, you think that your case deserves further investigation, you may call the Special Victims Unit Supervisor for the police department with jurisdiction over the location where the incident took place.

You can learn more about the difference between the reporting to the university and/or the police at the Office of Inclusion & Institutional Equity and/or through a TurnAround legal advocate. 

If I report to the university, who will get in trouble?

The university’s goal is not to get someone in trouble, but to respond to reports of sexual violence, eliminate the behavior, prevent its recurrence and address its effects. Part of this may include disciplinary action taken against another individual, which will involve holding the individual accountable for their behavior and taking steps to prevent this from happening again.

You have choices when you report and/or seek resources. If you seek out confidential resources, such as the Counseling Center or TurnAround, they are not required to notify the Office of Inclusion & Institutional Equity.

Do I have to report this to the police?

The option is entirely up to you. Reporting sexual violence to the appropriate police department is one option available to you, but you are not required to notify the police. 

 What if I was drunk or high at the time the incident took place?

 If you were under the influence of alcohol or drugs at the time of the incident or report, the university will NOT take action against you. 

Are my parents going to be called?

The university will not speak to your parents without your consent. 

The university or TurnAround can however, assist you with notifying your parents or other supportive individuals, should you choose to do so.

How many people am I going to have to talk to?

We are aware that victims/survivors often do not want to have to speak to multiple people. The Title IX Coordinator may ask you to share what took place, and may ask you to provide a written account of what happened. If a university hearing is convened, you will be asked to provide additional information and answer questions to the hearing board as well.

You can learn more about the the university and/or the police reporting and investigation process at the Office of Inclusion & Institutional Equity and/or through a TurnAround legal advocate. 

What if I don’t know who did this?

You can still report the sexual violence and share any relevant information with the university and/or police. The university will follow up with you, make sure that you are aware of appropriate on and off- campus resources and accommodations, and may be able to investigate based on the information you have provided.

You can learn more about the difference between the reporting to the university and/or the police at the Office of Inclusion & Institutional Equity and/or through a TurnAround legal advocate. 

Who is going to find out?

The staff at the university who will be involved in the response to the report, such as the Title IX Coordinator will be notified. Should you request housing, classroom, or transportation accommodations, the appropriate offices will be notified of the accommodation request, but not informed of the details of the report. All other students, faculty/staff, campus community members, and even the media/press will NOT be informed or communicated with regarding any complaint. The Title IX Coordinator can discuss any request for confidentiality with you at any time.

What happens if I request that my name be confidential or ask that the university not take any action?

If you request that your name not be revealed to the responding party (the person you are making the report about) or ask that the university not investigate or seek action against the responding party, the university will inform you that honoring the request may limit its liability to respond fully to the incident, including pursuing disciplinary action against the responding party. The university will also explain that Title IX includes protections against retaliation, and that university officials will not only take steps to prevent retaliation but will also take responsive action if it occurs.

Towson University supports a student’s interest in confidentiality in cases involving sexual violence; however, there are situations in which the university must override a student’s request for confidentiality in order to meet its obligations. These instances will be limited and the information will be maintained in a secure manner and will only be shared with individuals who are responsible for handling the university’s response to the incident of sexual violence.

If the university decides that it must take action after you asked the university not to investigate or seek discipline, the university would inform you of the decision to go forward.

If you report to the police, a police report will be made that includes your name. These reports are public record. 

You can learn more about the difference between the reporting to the university and/or the police at the Office of Inclusion & Institutional Equity and/or through a TurnAround legal advocate.