Entrepreneurship Minor

Make your passion your career with a minor in entrepreneurship.

entrepreneurship minor student

Develop your entrepreneurial potential and skills with the entrepreneurship minor. 

The spirit of innovation, creativity and idea development can be applied to almost any setting, such as starting a business, taking over a family business, or pursuing social/non-profit initiatives.

Why Choose the Entrepreneurship Minor?

  • Learn the basics of launching and building a startup and how to write a business plan
  • Build your creative thinking and problem solving skills through experiential learning
  • Develop an eye for spotting business opportunities and innovating
  • Gain confidence in your self and your ideas
  • Get a taste of what it takes to be an entrepreneur

Students in the entrepreneurship minor have access to helpful resources including:

Minor Requirements

The minor in Entrepreneurship is open to all Towson University undergraduate students except those who are pursuing a major in Business Administration with a concentration in Entrepreneurship.

All requirements for the entrepreneurship minor must be completed with a grade equivalent of 2.00 or higher. Of the required 18 units, at least 12 units must be completed at Towson University. Students are allowed a maximum of two attempts for all courses.

Approved Elective Courses

The following courses  are pre-approved to count toward the two elective requirements for the minor.

Approved Electives by College

Business & Economics

ECON 339 HEALTH ECONOMICS
Analysis of the economic organization of the health care sector of the U.S. economy; alternative health care delivery systems and methods of financing health care services; current issues in health economics. Prerequisites: ECON 201/ ECON 203 and ECON 202/ ECON 204.
 

ECON 370 SPORTS ECONOMICS
Study of sports and the sports industry using economic models. Organized according to the fields of industrial organization, public finance, and labor economics. Topics include league makeup, stadium financing, team location, competitive balance, and incentive structures. Prerequisites: ECON 201/ ECON 203 and ECON 202/ ECON 204. 

ECON 326 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
Theory of economic growth. Problems and programs relating to less developed countries. Prerequisites: ECON 201/ ECON 203 and ECON 202/ ECON 204.
 

ECON 334 ECONOMICS OF POVERTY AND DISCRIMINATION
Study of the causes of poverty. How poverty and discrimination are interrelated. An analysis of existing and proposed programs to alleviate poverty and discrimination. Prerequisites: ECON 201/ ECON 203 and ECON 202/ ECON 204. 

ECON 375 ENVIRONMENTAL ECONOMICS
Applying tools of economic theory to issues focusing on natural resources and environmental policy. Topics include market failure, valuation of non-market goods, cost-benefit analysis and pollution. Prerequisite: ECON 201/ ECON 203.
 

ECON 376 NATURAL RESOURCE ECONOMICS
Use of natural resources in the economy and related public policy issues emphasizing the role of property rights, markets, finance, and market failures. Topics may include resource scarcity, energy, forests, marine resources, water supply, biodiversity, land use, outdoor recreation, and international development. Prerequisite: ECON 201/ ECON 203.

MKTG 445 GLOBAL MARKETING
Impact of globalization, inter-country trade agreements, and national culture on country marketing environments and their influence on strategic marketing decisions related to pricing, product, channels of distribution, and marketing communications. Problems and obstacles related to acquiring information to guide market entry decisions and development of country marketing plans and policies. Prerequisites: MKTG 425; major in ACCT, BUAD, INST-BA or minor in MKTG; junior/senior standing.
 

MKTG 451  PERSONAL SELLING AND SALES MANAGEMENT
Successful selling, presenting and negotiating are core activities of boundary-spanning marketing 
positions; principles of personal selling and fundamentals of managing a sales force. Prerequisites: MKTG 341; major in BUAD or minor in MKTG; junior/senior standing.
 

Education

EDUC 203 TEACHING AND LEARNING IN A DIVERSE SOCIETY
Multicultural influences on education, processing self-awareness and awareness of others while exploring approaches to advocacy and social action with special attention to educational contexts. Includes field experience. GenEd II.C.3 or Core: Diversity & Difference.

Fine Arts and Communications

IDFA 470  SPECIAL TOPICS: BRANDING YOUR AUTHENTIC SELF

IDFA 471 SPECIAL TOPICS IN SOCIAL ACTION
A multidisciplinary and collaborative service-learning seminar that explores complex problems of the Baltimore metropolitan region. Includes creative projects and fieldwork with civic, community, and/or non-profit organizations. Topics vary and could include homelessness, domestic violence, drug abuse, disabilities, housing, education, health issues, and welfare. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 units when a different topic is covered. Prerequisite: junior/senior standing or consent of instructor.

MUSC 287 CREATIVE MUSIC TECHNOLOGY
Theory, techniques, practices, and aesthetics surrounding creative applications of current and emerging music technologies. Prerequisite: previous experience in High School music programs or consent of the department. Core: Creativity/Creative Development or 
GenEd. I.E.
 

MUSC 350 MUSIS INDUSTRY 1: LIVE PERFORMANCE
A survey of the music business focusing on songwriting, publishing, copyright, licensing, agents, managers, artist contracts, unions, concerts, musical theatre, arts administration and music products. Prerequisite: junior standing or department consent. 

MUSC 450 MUUSIC INDUSTRY 2: RECORDING & DIGITAL MEDIA
A survey of the music business focusing on record production, labels, promotion, distribution and marketing and on music in radio, television, videos, advertising, movies, games and production libraries. Prerequisite: Junior standing or department consent. 

MUSC 471 SPEICAL TOPICS: MUSIC ENTREPRENEURSHIP

COMM 380 LEADERSHIP COMMUNICATION
Students explore leadership from a communication processes perspective and investigate trends in leadership and communication. Through community partnership, the service learner will recognize him/herself as a leader by participating in civic engagement and developing leadership communication to facilitate civic change. Prerequisites: COMM 131 and COMM 201.
 

ART 361  DIGITAL OBJECT DESIGN
Ideas and technologies for developing 3-D models. Lab/Class fee will be assessed.
 

THEA 310 THEATRE FOR SOCIAL CHANGE
Examination of the theory and practice of theatre as a catalyst for social change. Development of original performances to address significant issues in contemporary American experience. Prerequisite: ENGL 102 or ENGL 190 or consent of instructor. 
GenEd II.B.3 or Core: Ethical Issues and Perspectives.

Health Professions

AHLT 315 FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT FO THE ALLIED HEALTH PROFESSIONAL
Overview of the financial methods and applications used in health care settings. Focus on understanding balance sheets, cost analysis, and budgeting for allied health within health care systems. Prerequisite: Admission to the Allied Health program or permission of instructor.

KNES 458 APPLIED SPORT MARKETING
Provides students interested in the field of sport marketing with a practical experience working with a sporting organization 
so as to assist in their professional preparation. Prerequisite: grade of C or higher in KNES 452.
 

KNES 391 SPORT EVENT MANAGEMENT
Theoretical issues and implementation of processes involved with the organization and management of a sport event.
 

Liberal Arts

ANTH 450  LIFE IN THE CITY
Analysis of the history and socioeconomic conditions of domestic and foreign cities through the lens of urban anthropology; application of urban anthropology theory and methods to Baltimore city through fieldwork and civic engagement activities. Prerequisites: ANTH 207 and two upper-level cultural anthropology courses.

CLST 201  INTRODUCTION TO CULTURAL STUDIES
Culture's effect on science, identity, and behavior and on what we hear, see, value and ignore. GenEd II.B.3 or Core: The United States as a Nation.    
 

CLST 311  SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY & CULTURE 
How science and technology interact with culture. Prerequisite: CLST 201. GenEd II.A or Core: Ethical Issues & Perspectives.

ENGL 228  FUTURE WORLDS 
Novels and short stories presenting alternative visions of the future. Writers such as Huxley, Bradbury, Orwell, Rand, Vonnegut, Berger, LeGuin and Atwood. Prerequisites: two English courses.    
 

ENGL 283 INTRODUCTION TO CREATIVE WRITING
Theories and technical considerations pertinent to creative writing in genres such as poetry, fiction, and creative nonfiction, with discussion of student writing. Prerequisite: ENGL 102 or ENGL 190. GenEd I.E or Core: Creativity & Creative Development.    
 

ENGL 315 WRITING CREATIVE NON-FICTION
Personal expression and exploration of the human experience through the form of the creative non-fiction essay. Prerequisite: ENGL 102 or ENGL 190. Core: Creativity and Creative Development.    
 

ENGL 401 GRANT AND ADVOCACY WRITING
History, theory, and practice of writing in public, non-profit, democratic, and humanitarian spaces. May include the study of rhetoric, writing, and communication as it applies to: service learning, community engagement, community organizing, grants, fundraising, charity drives, advocacy, social movements, e-newsletters, social media, public service announcements, and public relations. Prerequisite: Two ENGL courses.
                 

FMST 355  FUNDRAISING, FRIENDRAISING AND VOLUNTEER MANAGEMENT
How nonprofit organizations generate and manage financial and human resources, including the theoretical, behavioral and pragmatic foundations of philanthropy, fund development, and volunteerism. Prerequisites: FMST 350 & MKTG 341.    
 

FMST 360 DIVERSITY, CULTURE, AND TEAM DYNAMICS
Strategies for effective participation on a team with colleagues, friends and relatives for use in a globalized society or a local context. Examination of the components that influence group dynamics in teams and how members' culture and diversity shape them. Examination of people's differences, how they can agree on goals, and how they can work together effectively despite their differences. Engagement in team exercises to learn to overcome obstacles to teamwork. Prerequisite: FMST 101 or FMST 102 or PSYC 101 or SOCI 101. Core: Diversity and Difference.

GEOG 109 INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN GEOGRAPHY
Uses the analytical approach of social sciences in the study of institutions of human society to reveal spatial patterns in the responses of people to basic problems and needs. GenEd II.D or Core: Global Perspectives.    
 

GEOG 329 GEOGRAPHIES OF HEALTH
Interrelationship between health and our social and physical environments. Emphasis on geographic approaches to inequalities in health, well-being and care. Prerequisite: 6 units of geography.    
 

GEOG 359 ECONOMIC GEOGRAPHY
Designed to explain the location of economic activities through a series of principles and theories. Emphasis is on the various sectors of the economy, transportation, and economic development. Prerequisite: 6 units of geography or consent of instructor.    
 

GEOG 391 URBAN SYSTEMS
Survey of the structure, functions, forms and development of urban units. Emphasis upon the locational features of social, economic, and cultural phenomena. Field work. Prerequisite: 6 units of geography or consent of instructor.
   

SOCI 249  SOCIAL PROBLEMS
Theoretical and empirical understanding of the sociological approach to contemporary social problems, such as alcoholism, drug abuse, rape, homophobia, sexism, racism, poverty, family disorganization, violence. Prerequisite: SOCI 101.    
 

SOCI 323 SOCIAL MOVEMENTS
Exploration of the emergence, strategies, challenges, and outcomes of collective efforts to resist or promote social change. Emphasis on relationship between social movement organizations and major social institutions. Prerequisite: SOCI 101.    
 

SOCI 362 WORK AND OCCUPATIONS
Sociological theories and research on work and occupations; conceptions of work, occupation and profession; historical and contemporary issues in work and occupations; trends in blue and white-collar industries; the relationship between work and the self; implications of the modern distinction between work and family. Prerequisite: SOCI 101.    
 

SOCI 365 ORGANIZATIONS AND SOCIETY
Major social patterns associated with contemporary organizations; diversity and common elements among organizations; formal and informal aspects of bureaucracies; the growth of rationalization and McDonaldization; the impact and place of organizations in modern life. Prerequisite: SOCI 101.    
 

CRMJ 345 RACE AND CRIME
Structural and cultural dimensions of race-specific patterns of criminal offending and victimization. Focus on urban development, social construction of race, and the political-economy of crime and social control in America. Prerequisite: CRMJ 201 or SOCI 101.    
 

CRMJ 431 CRIMINAL JUSTICE OUTSIDE THE CLASSROOM
Integrates criminal justice issues related to reducing crime, reintegrating offenders, or responding to criminal victimization with real world projects designed by students in an external learning framework. Involves visiting and networking with community agencies in the criminal justice field. Prerequisites: CRMJ 254; CRMJ 353.

Science & Math

PHYS 103 HOW THINGS WORK
For non-science majors: a practical introduction to physics and science in everyday life. Examines the workings of everyday things from toys to next generation computers. Introduces fundamental science concepts underpinning ordinary to high tech objects, their principles of operation, the histories of their development. Emphasizes critical thinking and communication skills. Gen Ed II.A or Core: Biological & Physical Sciences.

COSC 109  COMPUTERS AND CREATIVITY
Creative activities involving symbolic manipulation and computer graphics; animation, dynamic 
story telling, computer music, visual effects, Web publishing, computer games, artwork and multimedia. Additional laboratory time required. GenEd I.E or Core: Creativity & Creative Development.
 

COSC 111 INFORMATION AND TECHNOLOGY FOR BUSINESS
Retrieve, process, classify, sort and evaluate data and information. Problem solving techniques, creative thinking skills, communication skills, team building, and professional ethics. Laboratories covering the Internet, spreadsheets, and databases. Additional laboratory time required. Students cannot earn credit for both this course and IDNM 101. 
GenEd I.B.
 

CIS 211 FUNDAMENTALS OF INFORMATION SYSTEMS & TECHNOLOGY
An introduction to information systems and technology in today's organizations. Topics include hardware, software and communications fundamentals, systems development, information management, work force considerations, and related societal, legal, and ethical issues. Prerequisite: COSC 111 (may be taken concurrently).
 

CIS 377 INFORMATION SYSTEMS SECURITY
Information systems security threats, technologies and business requirements, emphasizing human and technological aspects of IT security problems. Students who have completed CIS 477 will not receive additional credit for CIS 377. Prerequisites: major or minor sophomore standing.
 

CIS 426 GAMING INTERFACE DESIGN
Focuses on game design and the computer gaming industry. Designed to introduce the fundamental elements, frameworks and standards related to computer gaming. Instruction will be a combination of lectures, group/individual projects and class assignments aimed at the dissemination of conceptual elements with practical application. Prerequisite: CIS 379 or ITEC 411.
 

COSC 210 INTRODUCTION TO DIGITAL SECURITY AND DIGITAL FORENSICS
Introduction to digital security and digital forensics for computer science and non-computer science majors. Topics include the history and scope of digital crime, characteristics of various types of digital crime, the interrelationship of the fields of forensic science, behavioral science and computer science, and societal, legal and ethical issues related to digital security and forensics. 
GenEd II.B.3.
 

COSC 435 MOBILE APPLICATION DEVELOPMENT          

ITEC 485 CAPSTONE 

COSC 490 PROJECT PRACTICUM         

Why Choose a Minor?

Broaden Your Educational Experience

A minor course of study allows you to complement your major with a broader body of knowledge. You can pursue your personal passion and academic interests while still fulfilling the requirements of your major discipline. Enhance your resume and transcript and make yourself a more marketable job candidate by building your knowledge base and broadening your educational experience.

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